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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,760

    Default Just don't call me a cheesehead...

    Quote Originally Posted by Editor
    OK, then, but what were the precip and wind conditions during this period?

    Mark
    Average January Wind Speed:

    Irkutsk, Siberia: 4 mph
    Grand Forks, ND: 10 mph

    Average January Precip. (water content of snow)

    Irkutsk: 0.4 inches
    Grand Forkds: 0.7 inches (7.9 inches of snow)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,639

    Default I concede

    Quote Originally Posted by imported_Midwesterner
    Average January Wind Speed:
    Irkutsk, Siberia: 4 mph
    Grand Forks, ND: 10 mph

    Average January Precip. (water content of snow)
    Irkutsk: 0.4 inches
    Grand Forkds: 0.7 inches (7.9 inches of snow)
    You are really ruining my message points that it IS nicer in the Dakotas in the Winter than in Siberia. Makes Siberia almost sound doable -- maybe.

  3. Default North East April Roadtrip!

    Hi,

    I posted a while back and had some great responses so am hoping for the same again!

    A friend and I are flying from England to New York in the first week of April - we've got 2 weeks off work each, so are planning to travel around a little before returning to New York for a couple of nights then flying back to London.

    We've had a chat, and decided on this possible route based on these few factors; historical things we'd like to see, places that have some cool scenery, realistic proximity back to NY (for flight home and without retracing our steps), and good places for a few good nights out!

    So far, our plans are like this: NYC, Washington DC, Buffalo, Niagra Falls, Toronto, Montreal, Boston, Cape Cod, NYC.

    We're guessing we'll stay in NYC 1 night, travel to DC - maybe staying nearby the night then looking round DC in the day. Heading on up in the direction of Buffalo, staying overnight somewhere on route (considering going via West Virginia if only so we can sing 'Country Roads'!), staying overnight in Buffalo. Going onto Toronto via Niagra Falls - stay at Toronto 2 nights, Head towards Montreal possibly staying overnight on route in Ottawa/Kingston/Somewhere. Stay in Montreal 2 nights. Head down to Boston, again maybe stopping overnight somewhere on route. Stay in Boston 2 nights, then driving back to NYC, stopping off overnight somewhere on the way.

    Question is, firstly, are these places worth going to or are there some more interesting places in the area you'd recommend? Secondly where I've said, "staying somewhere overnight" can you think of anywhere viable to stay in the area that would be worth a visit to look round/for night out - and should we book anywhere in advance? Thirdly, and probably most importantly, how exactly should we do the travelling...we are thinking that car would be most fun - but bear in mind we have no experience of driving in the US, and don't know what the weather will be like to drive around to these places and how easy it will be to have a car and be staying a few nights in cities etc. Lastly is just a question of realism - is it conceivable we'll have enough time to drive (if you think it's the best option) to all these places, see the sites and what the have to offer, have a good roadtrip and get back to NYC in time for our flights?!

    We are still unsure if it's best to go clockwise too! Basically if you can think of anything we should bear in mind, or can offer any advice into any of the above it would be greatly appreciated. We're both really excited about the trip, but don't want to ruin any of it with unrealistic ideas or by planning something through our ignorance/lack of knowledge.

    Any comments would be great!
    Thanks.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Québec, Montreal, Arizona, California, France
    Posts
    761

    Default Many suggestions

    I posted a while back and had some great responses so am hoping for the same again!
    Welcome back Dignan!
    firstly, are these places worth going to or are there some more interesting places in the area you'd recommend?
    Every place is worth seeing. Read our road trip rules.
    Secondly where I've said, "staying somewhere overnight" can you think of anywhere viable to stay in the area that would be worth a visit to look round/for night out
    It depends on what you qualify as "viable" but you can virtually find decent lodging everywhere in Canada and in the US.
    and should we book anywhere in advance?
    That is mostly a personal choice. Here's an article that might help you figure it out. If you do want to make reservations, we have a tool for you.
    Lastly is just a question of realism - is it conceivable we'll have enough time to drive (if you think it's the best option) to all these places, see the sites and what the have to offer, have a good roadtrip and get back to NYC in time for our flights?!
    I think it is doable, although you may not have the opportunity to spend as much time as you want in each place.
    historical things we'd like to see, places that have some cool scenery, realistic proximity back to NY (for flight home and without retracing our steps), and good places for a few good nights out! [...]So far, our plans are like this: NYC, Washington DC, Buffalo, Niagra Falls, Toronto, Montreal, Boston, Cape Cod, NYC.
    2 Days in NYC, hum it's a challenge! First, I'd climb up the Empire State Building, catch a ferry to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. Then maybe walk in Central Park and browse the boutiques of Madison Avenue, have lunch in a Bryant Park's bistrot, visit art galleries in Soho, take the Brooklyn Bridge at sunset and walk on Fulton St., and don't forget about Greenwich Village! You can also try one of the many organized tours offered among the City like the Gangland Tour or the Big Apple Jazz Tour. Other suggestions here. For reasonnably priced lodging in or near NYC, check out that post.

    Now a few nightlife suggestions. The Village Vanguard is probaby one of the most reknown jazz club that has seen every star from the 50's and even welcomed Jack Kerouac's jazz-poetry readings. For great afterhour jazz, check out Small's marathons and jam sessions. Tonic, owned by sax player John Zorn, presents actual music concerts, underground films and poetry readings. The Tunnel nightclub on 12th Ave offers three well packed dance floors and features hot DJs. For a more relaxed atmosphere, Cabana on South Street serves tasty tapas with a view on the Statue of Liberty.

    On your way to Niagara, if you enjoy quirky attractions stop by the Jell-O Museum, in Leroy, NY and the Strong Museum and its Toy National Hall of Fame in Rochester. If you are wine lovers, follow the Lake Erie Wine Trail and visit a few Niagara wineries. The Niagara Falls are better seen from the Canadian side.

    Montreal is definitely a fun city. To avoid driving around for hours to look for a parking space or spend a fortune on indoor parking, I suggest you park in a street somewhere in the eastern part of town (east of Papineau for instance) and use the subway system (a.k.a Metro). The main commercial artery in Montreal is Ste. Catherine St. which more or less runs from far east to I-15.

    For history in Montreal, head to the Old Montreal/Old Port (mo : Champ-de-Mars or Place D'Armes) and browse Place Jacques-Cartier, St. Paul and De la Commune Streets, Marché Bonsecours, visit the breath taking Basilique Notre-Dame. There are also an Imax theater and a couple of interesting museums like Pointe-à-Callière in that part of town.

    One of my favourite restaurant in that area is far from being fancy. It is a vietnamese restaurant called Pho Bang New York. It is located in in Chinatown, on St. Laurent blvd near Viger St. They serve tasty soups (tonkinoises), exquisite lemon grass chicken (try #16) and refreshing lemonades for ridiculously cheap prices. Don't expect wine and flowers though, if you stick there too long, they may throw you out -- Can you believe they're actually featured in DeBeur?!:o) If you enjoy a more romantic atmosphere, go to Jardins Nelson and eat crepes (available for dinner and dessert) in their beautiful indoor garden. For a quick treat, order a "queue de castor" (transl. : beaver's tail) in a stand along De la Commune St. Don't worry, they're just pastries, no meat or beaver parts whatsoever. You can also try your luck at the Casino on Notre-Dame Island (better accessible by car, parking is free).

    For great views of the city, go to Parc du Mont-Royal (better accessible by car), the very intimate Westmount Belvedere on Summit Ave (by car) or climb the tower of the Olympic Stadium (mo : Pie IX) and why not visit the Biodôme and the Botanical Garden while you're there. To get away from the crowd of the "Stade", take a relaxing walk in Parc Maisonneuve. On the north side of the Mont-Royal lies the magnificient Oratoire St. Joseph (mo : Côte-des-Neiges) and the multiethnic part of town known as Côte-des-Neiges. For a great vietnamese bring-your-own-wine restaurant in CDN, try Chez Tung on Appleton.

    St. Laurent blvd is the "Main Street" of Montreal and is mostly reknown for its milling nightlife, outrageous cover charges and upscale restaurants (between Sherbrooke St. and Mont-Royal). If you want to go out in glamourous clubs on St. Laurent you better be well-dressed and behave. Crescent St. (mo : Guy) is also a very popular street for clubbing and the dress code is usually more casual. For a great intimate jazz evening, head to Upstairs on MacKay St. By the way, there's a youth hostel right down the street in a relatively quiet spot within downtown. If you feel like it, you can explore the underground city.

    The Plateau Mont-Royal (mo : Mont-Royal) is the new hip part of town where all the young professionals compete with each other to buy some tiny super-expensive colourful condos. The main artery, Mont-Royal Avenue, is bordered by trendy restaurants, small cafés, grunge boutiques and marginal independent record and book stores. The bistrot Bagel St-Viateur serves tasty bagels and homemade pesto fromage à la crème and stop by Fairmount Bagel Bakery to grab a few poppy seed bagels to bring back at your hotel.

    To get a feel of French culture, go to the Latin Quarter (mo : Berri-UQAM)and the Village (mo : Beaudry). The Latin Quarter's main street is St. Denis which bursts with boutiques, cafes, pubs and restaurants of all kinds. For a fun evening head to the Jell-O Bar on Ontario St. They have the kitschiest decor in town and serve weird but delicious martinis (chocolate, lychee & cranberry). For a different kind of nightlife, go to Cabaret Mado on Ste. Catherine. This bar features one of a kind quirky drag queen shows from 11 to 3 for everyone, straight or gay (cover ~5$CAD). Lots of interesting restaurants in that area : for Italian, try La Strega (bruschetta, pastas - 6-15CAD$), for French cuisine, try Au Petit Extra (rabbit, crème brûlée - 10-25CAD$), for Japanese food in a minimalist decor, try EstAsie (Teriyaki beef, sushis - 10-25CAD$) and finally for monstruous dessert and good coffee, Kilo is the place to be.

    The best cappuccino can be found at Caffè Epoca in little Italy. If you're looking for decent coffee and you can't seem to find a brûlerie, among all the chains, pick Second Cup. For inexpensive lodging in Montreal, check out that website. I also heard they have a couple of cheap rooms at the Oratoire St. Joseph and at the Université de Montréal.

    Since you said you liked history, I strongly suggest you make a detour by Quebec City. It is definitely the historical mecca of the province of Quebec, it has been designated a World Heritage City by the UNESCO. Here's a recent thread on this tremendous city.

    Here are a few suggestions for in or near Boston :
    -Witch Museum, Salem
    -Freedom Trail;
    -Charlestown;
    -Harvard University Campus, Cambridge;
    -Legal Sea Foods;
    -Dinner on Newberry St. (ex. : Stephanie's, Tapeo, etc);
    -Fire & Ice Restaurant;
    -P.s. Cheap lodging is not easy to find, even in the suburbs. You can either go to a youth hostel like this one or to the YMCA where you'll find private rooms for 60-100$. If you don't mind sleeping out of the city, you can easily find lodging for less 75$ in chains if you look at the right places.

    Finally, in Cape Cod, check out the followings :
    -Commercial St. in PTown;
    -Cape Cod National Sea Shore, Race Pt and Herring Cove Beaches;
    -For cheap lodging look for the Budget Host Inn in Hyannis or one of the youth hostels. The Elephant Walk Inn in PTown is a great place to stay but is more expensive.

    Happy planning!
    Geneviève
    Last edited by Mark Sedenquist; 03-12-2006 at 07:54 PM. Reason: removed extra spaces

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