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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,260

    Default Three that I know of in Montana

    Quote Originally Posted by Judy
    Gosh, how many of those teeny, tiny little 1, 2, 3 car ferries for free are there?
    I was in Montana yesterday -- found three along the Snake River. More details in a couple of days.

    Mark

  2. #22
    RoadTripper Brad Guest

    Default

    I don't know how big the ferry is (couldn't be much bigger than the one's described here), but there is a Ferry Crossing in Washington, Judy, that might be up your alley. In Eastern Washington, on the far upper Columbia on highway 21, there is a free crossing on the river between the main Columbia Basin and the Collville Reservation, called the Keller Ferry, and another between Gifford and Inchelium (from highway 25 to a local Collville Tribal road) called the Gifford Ferry. Both are free, so the next time you are up around the Collville Tribal Lands, check them out. The Columbia river being not increadibly wide, there shouldn't be a boat any bigger than perhaps a 6 car ferry (depending on traffic).

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Cool...thanks, Brad. I've been up that way several times but I guess I've never gone the right way to find ferries. Might be worth a special roadtrip just for that. It's just such a quaint idea. They sound charming. Much more fun than the big behemoths which ply Puget Sound. Oh, not that these aren't fun as well but the smallness of those little ferries just appeals to me.

    Mark, I'll look forward to those details!

  4. Default Message to AZBuck

    Day 14! Day 14! Day14!

    Just a little more encouragement to continue with your travelogue efforts.... (We're enjoying them!)

    Bob

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,734

    Default Field Report: Part 5 - All Good Things Must Come to an End

    Day 14: Two nice things about staying near a city (in this case, Little Rock) are that there are plenty of moderately priced, slightly upscale places to stay, and that when you leave town in the morning, the rush hour traffic piles up on the opposite side of the median. In any event, todayís first stop is Crater of Diamonds State Park outside Murfreesboro, AR. This is the only diamond mine in the US, and may be the only one in the world that allows the general public to dig for and keep the precious stones. It also has the usual state park amenities such as hiking, camping and a nice little museum, but the draw here is digging. They routinely plow up the ground to aid in the search and will rent the casual visitor some simple implements, but make no mistake, this is work. Even though I arrive relatively early in the morning, there are already a few dozen people out in the field, and more arrive constantly. Itís clear that most of them are regulars and have brought serious digging and sifting tools, chairs, shade and water. Considering that the largest diamond found since this became a state park was 16 carats, and that a OOO (perfect) diamond was also found here, one can understand why. However, it all looks like much more work than I want to put in, and I doubt Iíd find anything in the hour or two I could spare, I just watch for awhile, tour the museum and head out.

    For the rest of the day, I work my way west on US‑70, basically following the Red River. I do make a small detour to go to Beaverís Bend State Park north of Broken Bow, OK. This is just one more gem of a state park. Itís listed as a Ďresort parkí and lives up to its name. It seems to cater to canoeists, fishermen and wildlife watchers. I again get great advice at the visitorís center and make use of their 2 mile nature trail that focuses on the trees of the region. The main thing I note, though, about traveling US‑70 in this area is that Iím back in the southwest and speed limits are back up to 65-70, and the towns are getting pretty far apart. Even so, I get to Waurika too late for the Chisholm Trail Museum which closed at 4:00, so the day ends when I pull in to Vernon, TX. Miles on the Dials: 505.8

    Day 15: Iím now definitely back in the southwest, and things are drying out rapidly. Iím also starting to realize that Iíll be home shortly. I start the day with a stop at Caprocks State park just north of Quitaque, TX. This is badlands terrain, mainly set up for camping, horseback riding and fishing. I set off for a hike back up into some canyons on a well marked trail and just enjoy a bright warm day. There have been many warnings given by various contributors on the advisability of carrying sufficient water when hiking in the desert, and today proves to be a case in point. I went in with about a liter of water and turned around when I had used half of it. Even though I hadnít been hiking all that long, it was very warm. As it turned out, on the my return I came to realize that the trail I had been following had many footprints on it, but where I was now showed only the tracks I was making as I went. Clearly I had lost the trail at some point, but where and most importantly, how far would I have to backtrack? My water was nearly gone and I hadnít seen anyone since I entered the park. As It turned out, I had to backtrack about a half mile to a point where the trail had crossed a wash at an oblique angle and I had followed the wash. What little water I had left, I drank and kept a steady pace (and close eye on the trail) back to the car where I had a gallon of chilled water waiting. I was lucky that I noticed that I had lost the trail as early as I did and did not hesitate to just follow my own tracks back to the trail. But still, never take anything for granted.

    I also make a stop in Sumner, NM to see the grave of Billy the Kid and the small, adjacent museum. This is another one of those stops that is worth making, but only if youíre going to be in Sumner anyway. The grave is nothing spectacular. But then how many graves are. And the museum is an eclectic catch as catch can bunch of stuff, but still, all in all, the stop was a pleasant enough way to spend an hour and a few bucks in an otherwise empty landscape. I had planned on this being a relatively short day, and only covered 384.9 miles, but I was making much better time than I had inticipated on these wide open, high speed limit two-lane roads and rolled into Vaughn, NM for my last stop at what was only 3:30 local time. My wife and I are scheduled to have dinner with her sister tomorrow night, so I just keep my mind on central time, go to bed early.

    Day 16: So, I get up at 4:00 the next morning (local time Ė 3:00 where Iím headed), and head out. The plan is to stop at some pueblo ruins in central New Mexico if time permits. Things were going well (or so I thought) until I suddenly found myself facing an on-ramp for I‑40 which should have been well north of my route. It turned out, as near as I could tell, that I had taken a wrong turn in Encino, NM, picking up US‑285 instead of staying on US‑60. Iím not so much upset that I missed a turn, such things happen. But I am a little bit miffed that nowhere in the 27 miles from Encino to I‑40 had there been any signs indicating the route number I was traveling. Not that big a deal, It probably added maybe 50 miles to the trip, but it meant that the pueblos were no longer on my route. So I just headed on home (551.3 miles today), took a nap, and then went out to dinner with family, a great end to the trip

    AZBuck
    Last edited by AZBuck; 09-29-2005 at 10:07 PM. Reason: Housekeeping

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,734

    Default Ferries

    How many tiny ferries are there? I don't know, but I do look for them when I plan roadtrips and will take them when I can. A few that I know of (and have pictures on the web):

    Woodland Ferry, DE

    The Green River and Houchin ferries in Kentucky

    Cumberland River, KY

    Rocky Hill - Glastonbury, CT

    Chester - Hadlyme, CT

    Oxford - Bellvue ferry in Maryland

    There are also at least half a dozen ferries still operating on the Mississippi, a similar number (passanger only) serving Smith and Tangier Islands in the Chesapeake, and a few in tidewater Virginia as well as the ferries previously mentioned on the Columbia. All of these are in addition to the major ferry systems of Alaska, Washington and North Carolina. I just find them a welcome and restful break in any driving trip.

    AZBuck
    Last edited by AZBuck; 08-21-2018 at 09:48 PM. Reason: Updated links and added a ferry

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Thanks for yet another great trip report! I'm sad to see them end. But I'm glad you discovered you were off trail before you got farther and it became even more risky for you. In other words, here's to your health!!

    Thanks for the tips about the small ferries. (The one in Green River, KY, is especially cute.) How do you find them when searching your trips? I'm going to make this my mission to find these types of ferries for future trips. But, unless the state DOT websites have them, how else do you track them down?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    169

    Default copycat

    Hey AzBuck- Sounds good. I might keep this in mind & contact you via this forum in the next year or two, to COPY your trip in detail.
    Thanks for the ideas.

  9. Default St Louis area ferries

    There are two of these little ferries that operate north of St Louis -- one across the Illinois River, the other across the Mississippi. They are easily located on the map.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,260

    Default I think this generation has that distinction....

    Quote Originally Posted by AZBuck View Post
    In what we all find our most fascinating bit of family history, his son, my 8-great-grandfather, moved to western Massachusetts and was caught in the Pascommuck Massacre (1703 in what would become Northampton, MA). He and his wife were captured and all of their children murdered. He escaped, and in retribution my grandmother was scalped and left to die on Pomeroy Mountain. Fortunately for me, he raised the alarm, got the local militia on the heals of the raiders, found grandma, nursed her back to health, and had a whole new flock of kids.
    Yikes! That is a riveting tale! My maternal great grandfather and his family organized some of the Texas cattle drives and help set up the territorial governments of Wyoming and Montana... There are some hair-raising tales from those early days too -- I will locate my notes and add some.

    But... with respect to your family tree --I would say that your accomplishments outstrip even your great-8-grandfather's exploits -- how many people do you know that can claim to have managed and/or worked on planetary missions to every planet in our solar system? That is an amazing feat!

    Mark

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