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  1. Default Moving from WA to PA, would like some help planning route.

    Hello all!

    Asking for some help, I'm not a total noob to long trips but this will be the longest distance I've traveled driving to date.

    I will be moving from the state of Washington to Pennsylvania this month. I'm driving a 20 ft Uhaul with an Auto Transport trailer behind.
    Ideally i'd like to stay on the interstate as much as possible and take the most direct route. If we could avoid any major traffic junctions or interchanges that would be great as I'd hate to be driving in a congested area with this truck and trailer. I'm not in a particular rush to get this trip done as my attitude is to make this as safe as possible instead of pushing extra long days and risking over doing it.. I will be the only driver but will have a passenger to keep me company. I think 5 days is reasonable time frame but if its longer then that's fine.

    Any road trip advice and route suggestions would be very helpful.

    Also i'm a bit afraid someone will steal my truck while i'm stopped and resting, anyone know how commonly this happens? Any theft prevention tips? From reading Reddit i'm under the impression that this is a real possibility however I am not sure if i'm just stressing myself out.

    I'll be leaving this Friday.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    South of England.
    Posts
    11,819

    Default

    Hello and welcome to the RTA forums!

    To get a detailed response to your question it would be best to share your start and end points in each state. I-90/94 looks the most direct route although others may offer alternatives. Depending on where you start and finish, I would say 5 days is at the top end of what you would want to do comfortably with a Uhaul and trailer and another night on the road could be beneficial, unless you are including collecting, loading and unloading the truck, then an extra day will be essential.

    I wouldn't stress about having the truck stolen and just use common sense when parking up, a well lit busy hotel lot should be reasonably safe but if somewhere doesn't feel right, it usually isn't so move along. Sure it's possible but unlikely so best to concentrate on getting a good nights rest rather than something that hasn't happened yet.

    One last tip, if you stop near a city, try and get on the east side so that when you depart in the morning you are heading away from the early morning work traffic heading into the city.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Central Missouri
    Posts
    5,777

    Default

    Hi!

    My husband and I moved a year ago, and we've moved our kiddo as well. So some pieces of advice:

    * Provide your own lock for the truck, but make sure it's a good one.

    * Allow U-Haul to assist you with tying your car to their trailer. They do it all the time; don't let them bully you into doing it completely by yourself.

    * Search out overnight lodgings ahead of time, in the comfort of your own home. Book them about 450-500 miles apart, don't try to do more. Look for "truck parking" in their ad and then CALL the place to ask how many spaces. (We took one place without calling, and they only fit 3 long rigs in their lot. Thank heavens we were in by 3 pm or we'd have been parking a long way away!

    * Keep your own overnight luggage easily accessible. If you put it inside the car that's being towed, realize that only one door is going to be able to be opened. If you have a hatchback or trunk, that would be a better place.

    * I will concur with Dave -- stay on the east side of any city you must stay at, or go beyond it.

    * Another problem that can occur with long rigs are restaurant parking. Most (but not all) Cracker Barrels have long-rig parking. Truck stops, which usually contain fast food these days, are better set up for long-rigs. Some truck stops will have a sit-down restaurant there -- Flying J will often have a Denny's, and we've found iHOP at TA's.

    * Interstates are definitely your best bet. They have the easiest grades. But Dave stated we can give you better routing if we know your basic starting and stopping points, at least generally.

    Here are two moving trips we've done. One is with a truck towing a car on a trailer, and a separate car being driven. The other is with a U-Haul truck and car trailer combo.


    Donna

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    10,189

    Default

    I don't think I'd take I-90/94. Depending on start and end points, I'd look at getting to I-84 in eastern OR, then I-80 to western IL, I-74 to Indy, then I-70. If going to western or northern PA, I-71 from Columbus to I-76 back to I-80. If going to southern or eastern PA, stay on I-70 to I-79 to I-68 back to I-70 to I-81. You can't avoid all cities, but look at taking belt route bypasses around the ones you do encounter.

    This avoids Chicago traffic and a ton of tolls.

  5. Default

    Thanks for feedback everyone! I appreciate the helpful tips and the links to the other threads.

    I'm leaving from Puyallup, Wa to Myerstown, PA to be more specific.

    I think the route GLC suggested sounds like a good idea since I would definitely like to avoid Chicago and Toll roads as much as possible.

    Donna, GLC and Southwest Dave, Thank you for the tips and advice!

    I really appreciate all of the help.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    10,189

    Default

    Great!

    From Puyallup, take WA-18 to I-90 to I-82 to I-84 to I-80. Then take I-74 to Indy, take the *south* I-465 bypass to I-70. At Columbus, take the *south* I-270 bypass. Then take I-79 to I-68 back to I-70 to I-81. Then take I-78 to PA-645 into Myerstown. This is about 3000 miles which would be a MINIMUM of 6 days if towing. There are ZERO tolls on this route. The only cities of any consequence are Indy and Columbus, hence the bypass recommendations.

    From experience and for planning purposes, plan on 6 miles per gallon. U-hauls are all gas, no diesel available, and have a very thirsty V8 or V10. That's 500 gallons of gas, could cost you almost $2000.

    *NOTE* - I recommend you take I-470 through Wheeling. I-70 can be a hassle.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,196

    Default I'll second that

    Quote Originally Posted by glc View Post
    I don't think I'd take I-90/94. Depending on start and end points, I'd look at getting to I-84 in eastern OR, then I-80 to western IL, I-74 to Indy, then I-70. If going to western or northern PA, I-71 from Columbus to I-76 back to I-80. If going to southern or eastern PA, stay on I-70 to I-79 to I-68 back to I-70 to I-81. You can't avoid all cities, but look at taking belt route bypasses around the ones you do encounter.

    This avoids Chicago traffic and a ton of tolls.
    I have driven this very route on more than one occasion, at the author's recommendation. I can assure you it is a great route - even on all Interstates. Have a safe trip

    Lifey

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