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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,474

    Default

    I do support every medical and scientific professional that is working to come up with a cure and a vaccine. You can be sure that once the latter is tested, I'll be getting it. It took me 40 years to finally get my first flu shot. I will try not to wait THAT long for a COVID vaccination!

    Hubby and I finally did the right thing and canceled our plans for Death Valley NP. We are both disappointed, but we know that come fall, winter or spring break next year, we can try again. I think the biggest push, beyond my own vulnerability to this thing, was the closure of restaurants. Neither of us could imagine 4 days straight of fast-food taken from the only two drive-throughs in Lone Pine (McD's and Carl's Jr), every meal, and we're not sure what would be available in DVNP for lunches. We couldn't find information about whether our hotel would allow us to cook in the room, and there were none of those places with kitchenettes available in either LP or Big Pine. (They're small towns.)

    This is one situation where we wish we still had our 5W trailer. We'd take it up to DVNP or somewhere with few people and just hole up there, having all of our own facilities right on board. It makes me wonder how many people are renting RV's to do just that.

    In the meantime -- if anyone is interested in a series of travel books to read during this time, I highly suggest Matt and Karen Smith's Dear Bob and Sue series. In Season 1, they travel (often fly/drives) to every single national park in the US, and I do mean every one of them. That took place in 2010, when they took a year off work and a bunch of $ from savings to make that happen. Then in Season 2, they start checking out national monuments, state parks and other natural areas. I haven't finished Season 3 yet, but they are continuing this quest and it's now 2018. These are memoirs in the form of emails to friends. They're not done for tourist information, these are their own thoughts and responses to what they see. They are also into hiking, to the tune of 6-10 mile day hikes and an occasional backpack. (I'm coming up on their backpack up the Chilkoot Trail from Skagway, AK.)

    If you can't get these from your library, because it's closed or they don't have the books, they're reasonably priced from many sellers, including Amazon and (the first 2 only) Barnes & Noble online. BTW, our county library system has a "Drive through" program starting today, where you order your books online and then come and get them when they're ready. That way we aren't going cabin-crazy during this "unprecedented time". Yeah, I'm off school, though I have virtual "office hours" from 10 to noon every day.


    Donna

  2. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaR57 View Post

    Hubby and I finally did the right thing and canceled our plans for Death Valley NP.......

    This is one situation where we wish we still had our 5W trailer. We'd take it up to DVNP or somewhere with few people and just hole up there, having all of our own facilities right on board. It makes me wonder how many people are renting RV's to do just that.


    Donna
    Donna,

    Sorry to hear you had to cancel. We spend 8 days camping in Furnace Creek from March 2 to March 10th. As we left they got a lot of big rains that closed a lot of the scenic drives. I don't know if they've reopened yet. As for campgrounds, ALL the campgrounds in Death Valley are closed! You would have had to camp outside the park if you still had your 5th Wheel. https://www.nps.gov/deva/planyourvisit/conditions.htm

    With the governor putting the whole state of California on shelter in place....you're probably better off at home.

    We heading home in our RV a week early.

    Utahtea

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,944

    Default

    The following is from Irene Ken, physician, whose daughter is an Asst. Prof in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins University, quite informative.

    * The virus is not a living organism, but a protein molecule (DNA) covered by a protective layer of lipid (fat), which, when absorbed by the cells of the ocular, nasal or buccal mucosa, changes their genetic code. (mutation) and convert them into aggressor and multiplier cells.

    * Since the virus is not a living organism but a protein molecule, it is not killed, but decays on its own. The disintegration time depends on the temperature, humidity and type of material where it lies.

    * The virus is very fragile; the only thing that protects it is a thin outer layer of fat. That is why any soap or detergent is the best remedy, because the foam CUTS the FAT (that is why you have to rub so much: for 20 seconds or more, to make a lot of foam).

    By dissolving the fat layer, the protein molecule disperses and breaks down on its own.

    * HEAT melts fat; this is why it is so good to use water above 25 degrees Celsius for washing hands, clothes and everything. In addition, hot water makes more foam and that makes it even more useful.

    * Alcohol or any mixture with alcohol over 65% DISSOLVES ANY FAT, especially the external lipid layer of the virus.

    * Any mix with 1 part bleach and 5 parts water directly dissolves the protein, breaks it down from the inside.

    * Oxygenated water helps long after soap, alcohol and chlorine, because peroxide dissolves the virus protein, but you have to use it pure and it hurts your skin.

    * NO BACTERICIDE OR ANTIBIOTIC SERVES. The virus is not a living organism like bacteria; antibodies cannot kill what is not alive.

    * NEVER shake used or unused clothing, sheets or cloth. While it is glued to a porous surface, it is very inert and disintegrates only
    -between 3 hours (fabric and porous),
    -4 hours (copper and wood)
    -24 hours (cardboard),
    - 42 hours (metal) and
    -72 hours (plastic).

    But if you shake it or use a feather duster, the virus molecules float in the air for up to 3 hours, and can lodge in your nose.

    * The virus molecules remain very stable in external cold, or artificial as air conditioners in houses and cars.

    They also need moisture to stay stable, and especially darkness. Therefore, dehumidified, dry, warm and bright environments will degrade it faster.

    * UV LIGHT on any object that may contain it breaks down the virus protein. For example, to disinfect and reuse a mask is perfect. Be careful, it also breaks down collagen (which is protein) in the skin.

    * The virus CANNOT go through healthy skin.

    * Vinegar is NOT useful because it does not break down the protective layer of fat.

    * NO SPIRITS, NOR VODKA, serve. The strongest vodka is 40% alcohol, and you need 65%.

    * LISTERINE IF IT SERVES! It is 65% alcohol.

    * The more confined the space, the more concentration of the virus there can be. The more open or naturally ventilated, the less.

    * You have to wash your hands before and after touching mucosa, food, locks, knobs, switches, remote control, cell phone, watches, computers, desks, TV, etc. And when using the bathroom.

    * You have to HUMIDIFY HANDS DRY from so much washing them, because the molecules can hide in the micro cracks. The thicker the moisturizer, the better.

    * Also keep your NAILS SHORT so that the virus does not hide there.

    -JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    597

    Default

    This is really good information! Thanks for posting it here.

    Rick

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,477

    Default beating me to it!

    George,

    I was just about to post the same article. Thanks for beating me to it!

    Mark

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,944

    Default

    How to make a face mask without sewing:

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/...sk-coronavirus

    I used version 1. All you need is a t-shirt, safety pin, and a coffee filter or paper towel.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    5,474

    Default

    I find this Health Dept chart to be very helpful. I am currently suffering from what I think are allergies, the type that I usually have in March/April/May. This chart compares symptoms of COVID-19 with the flu, colds, and allergies:

    COVIDsymptoms.jpg



    Donna

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,477

    Default Interesting but not a good match for me

    I get a sore throat every year from allergies --

    Like most years -- here are my typical allergy symptoms:

    Headache, very mild fever, chills, sore/scratchy throat, light cough, fatigue. Somewhat similar to COVID-19, but since I have them every year --I can conclude that it's just more allergies. If any of the symptoms were to turn severe -- I'd respond accordingly -- but typically these kind of symptoms present every December and last until we return to triple digits in early May. So, that's that challenge of these kinds of symptoms. There are lots of pollen-producing plants here in Las Vegas.

    Mark

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Western/Central Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,712

    Default Considering myself very lucky

    My employer took action very quickly and fortunately I am in a situation where I am able to work from home. Our offices are almost completely closed except for those who have to deal with things such as mail, etc. Also, hindsight shows that having Sharon's store close in 2018 was probably for the best - I doubt it would have survived this situation. We are doing well and are going to be working on some plans for future trips, including planning for the 2024 total solar eclipse. The 2017 total solar eclipse was just absolutely spectacular. In 2024, it's going to be much closer to home.

    There are some distributed computing platforms such as Rosetta that are working on the virus, and I've been running some of these when my computer is idle. I'm not a medical professional and about the only thing I can do to help out is stay home. That and share some CPU/GPU cycles.

    Thanks for the book recommendations. For those in Massachusetts, the CW MARS (library) system is allowing the use of mobile phone numbers as temporary library cards to access electronic resources. I'm sure other states have done something similar.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,944

    Default

    There are some distributed computing platforms such as Rosetta that are working on the virus
    Folding @ Home is another one.

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