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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,559

    Default

    Since all posts appear in-line, you can respond to all of them at once in a single reply. It would also help to clear up which one you're responding to if you mention the other poster's name.
    At the bottom of each post, just to the right of "Reply With Quote", there's a icon that looks like a quote symbol with a +. Click that in each post you want to reply to, then click "Reply to Thread" at the bottom of the thread. You will find that each post is quoted along with the name of the person that posted it. Edit each quote to remove unnecessary duplication and insert spaces between the quotes to write your response. My next post will be an example of this.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,559

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Southwest Dave View Post
    Hello and welcome to the RTA forums !

    There really are thousands of possible routes and attractions on a trip that crosses the country and back so it will need a little work on your part to narrow things down a bit.
    Agreed!

    Quote Originally Posted by NowthatIamretired View Post
    Iím not one of the gurus here but do live in Virginia and we did a road trip to Denver and back last summer which hooked me on road tripping.
    Excellent!

    Quote Originally Posted by Midwest Michael View Post
    I'll mostly echo the very good advice that's been given..
    As will I.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,867

    Default

    I will second AZBuck's vote for the large scale, laminated spiral Rand McNally atlas. It is very durable! When I compare it to the smaller scale paper atlas, I really prefer the larger scale. Sure makes those tiny little towns and sites of interest easier to see and read!


    Donna

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    South of England.
    Posts
    11,094

    Default

    I’ve seen other postings that state there are sights such as Yellowstone and Mt. Rushmore along the way.
    If you would like to explore some of the west coast then I would recommend a more northern route heading west (Badlands, Black hills, Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, Glacier NP) so that the ocean and it's scenic pull outs will be on your side of the road when heading south. The Oregon and California coasts are both wonderful but there are great parks to explore inland down the Cascades, such as Mt Rainier, Mt St Helens and Crater Lake. If you ended up as far south as San Francisco I would recommend heading to Yosemite NP and make your way across Death valley to the Grand canyon and then look at the natural beauty and National parks of Utah and Colorado. These include Zion, Bryce, Arches, Canyonlands, Mesa Verde, Black canyon and Rocky mountain NP. If you plan to visit a number of National parks then it's wise to purchase the annual pass as it would have paid for itself after visiting 4 major parks.

  5. #15

    Default

    I am another of the non-guru non-experts in the group. Over the past several decades I have made many road trips, via hitchhiking very long ago or driving. I have made annual road trips the past 4 years, twice cross country from Maryland to Southern/Central California, one to S. Dakota-Wyoming-N. Arizona and back, and a New England-Quebec City-Ottawa-Akron and back. I am a camper van road-tripper and probably split nights 50/50 in the van and motels (although I have never calculated the splits). I rely heavily on on-line tools and information for trip planning but also printed travel guides and AAA maps (USA, regional and state). I also use my Garmin and often times program it with waypoints and lat/lon coordinates (the lat/lon coordinates are essential in some parts of the country or cities). The AAA Plus plan is good for long distance road trips, e.g., the 100 mile tow instead of the nearest AAA facility typically in a 5-mile radius.

    Whether you camp or stay in motels or a combination, has a direct bearing on daily travel planning. Time is more of a factor when simply going from point A to point B. The time spent setting up/breaking camp is not a significant factor when visiting a national park as most motels are outside park boundaries and during the summer hours it can take awhile to enter Yellowstone NP from one of the border towns.

    Since this could be one of your last major road trips, and you have been to the Pacific Northwest (PNW) a lot and plan to resettle there, this might be the time to see some of America's great sites short of the West Coast. Shaving off the West Coast area of Washington, Oregon, and California effectively gives you an extra 10 days. More time for Yellowstone through Grand Canyon if one was to draw an imaginary North-South longitudinal line (think the US 89 drive also know as the national parks highway). If camping in the parks you will want to make reservations far in advance of travel (6 months in-advance is when reservations open up) as they sites book up early. If you are retired, and aged 62, you are eligible to purchase the senior pass which provides free park admission plus usually half-price camping.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,070

    Default Maps - the larger the better.

    Quote Originally Posted by NowthatIamretired View Post
    We put a map of Europe on a wall and told our boys, ages 12 & 15, to put pins in where they wanted to go.
    Nothing like having a large laminated map - the largest you can get - on the wall to plan a trip, and get input from the whole family. If you don't want pins in your wall, use post-it notes. Follow all the suggestions and soon a route starts to appear, including most of the marked attractions.

    I leave my maps up all the time, to mark and recall places I may want to see on future trips. As well, excellent maps are really quite decorative on a large blank wall.

    Lifey

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Southwest Dave View Post
    If you would like to explore some of the west coast then I would recommend a more northern route heading west (Badlands, Black hills, Grand Tetons, Yellowstone, Glacier NP) so that the ocean and it's scenic pull outs will be on your side of the road when heading south. The Oregon and California coasts are both wonderful but there are great parks to explore inland down the Cascades, such as Mt Rainier, Mt St Helens and Crater Lake. If you ended up as far south as San Francisco I would recommend heading to Yosemite NP and make your way across Death valley to the Grand canyon and then look at the natural beauty and National parks of Utah and Colorado. These include Zion, Bryce, Arches, Canyonlands, Mesa Verde, Black canyon and Rocky mountain NP. If you plan to visit a number of National parks then it's wise to purchase the annual pass as it would have paid for itself after visiting 4 major parks.
    We definitely have the annual park pass as we frequently visit them. However, I believe this post gives me exactly what we were looking for as a starting point!

    Thank you Thank you :)

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