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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,169

    Default That explains it.

    Michael, you have explained a lot. Regarding the Subaru, most of my knowledge and observance goes back to my 2004 and 2007 trips, especially the trip up to AK in 2004. I saw an unbelievable number of Subarus on that trip. And they were all badged Outback.

    When I got my Outback I noticed that it was quite a bit higher/taller than my daughter-in-law's in Boston. It was more like the Liberty. And yes, the Liberty is a sedan and station wagon but at home I have never seen the hatch back. Your explanation makes perfect sense. Why do car makers have to make it so complicated?

    On the other hand, the Yaris with which I am familiar is nothing like the picture posted by Donna. It is more like a Forrester.

    Lifey

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    South of England.
    Posts
    11,658

    Default Cleaner diesels.

    I can see how the emissions problem has had a major impact on sales in the past, but modern diesels are so clean. Although I do not know what type of tests the US use, our Car tax license costs are based on CO2 readings and have been since 2001 to put pressure on car mftrs to think 'Green'. [The higher the CO2 'band' the more expensive it gets]

    Here's 2 comparitive examples of VW equal on performance with the diesel offering a 'bucket load' more of Torque. [236lb/ft V 148lb/ft] The diesel puts out lower emissions and uses less fuel.

    VW Golf 2ltr turbo diesel CO2 output 128g/km MPG [combined] 57.6

    VW Golf 1.4 FSI petrol. CO2 output 138g/km MPG [combined] 47.1

    The same goes with diesel prices here, it used to be almost half the price of petrol and is now more expensive since they became so popular, go figure ! I do think a lot of people here get hooked on car tax and mpg costs without taking higher initial purchase cost and fuel costs into consideration. If you do not do many miles per year it takes a heck of a long time to get those higher costs back and start saving.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,722

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lifemagician View Post
    On the other hand, the Yaris with which I am familiar is nothing like the picture posted by Donna. It is more like a Forrester.
    I was curious about this, and after looking at Toyota's Aussie website, I'm not seeing the big differences. The Yaris there looks to be quite similar to the one sold in the US, and also is the smallest car they sell there too.

    Neither is really seems to be comparable to the Forester at all. The Forester is 2 feet longer and a full foot taller than the Yaris. The only comparison I can see a little bit is the shape is a little bit similar, being more boxy, but otherwise they are pretty vastly different vehicles. The Forester is much more similar in size and price to the outback. A top of the line Yaris is AU$10,000 less than an entry level Forrester.

    But maybe I'm missing something here, or something else is getting lost in translation?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,722

    Default pushing my knowledge level

    Quote Originally Posted by Southwest Dave View Post
    I can see how the emissions problem has had a major impact on sales in the past, but modern diesels are so clean. Although I do not know what type of tests the US use, our Car tax license costs are based on CO2 readings and have been since 2001 to put pressure on car mftrs to think 'Green'. [The higher the CO2 'band' the more expensive it gets]
    I might be getting out over my skis knowledge-wise here, but I think the issue with Diesels in the US hasn't been CO2 as much as it has been particulate and other kinds of pollution, which is especially key when it comes to California and their smog issues.

    Still, even there, the technology is certainly improving and it is now possible to make a "50 state" diesel, which is why companies beyond VW are starting to get into the market. There's also the element that people simply aren't used to driving diesels here, and their knowledge of them consists either from loud, smelly trucks or from some of the older, more primitive and less reliable diesel cars of old, so there's a bit of a headwind for them to get a foothold in the market.


    The same goes with diesel prices here, it used to be almost half the price of petrol and is now more expensive since they became so popular, go figure !
    Diesel prices have also gone up here, and now are almost always more expensive than unleaded, however, my understanding is that a huge part of that is that the fuel itself has changed. I believe diesel is now required to be formulated to burn much more cleanly, but the process to get it there is more expensive than older fuels.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,169

    Default Going purely from memory......

    Quote Originally Posted by Midwest Michael View Post
    But maybe I'm missing something here, or something else is getting lost in translation?
    Michael, it was the shape I was referring to when I mentioned the Forrester. On the other hand, it is a long time since I have looked closely at the Yaris. I don't know anyone who has one, there are not many on the road where I live. Going purely from memory can be dangerous, especially since I am busy practicing my alzhiemers. Seems I'm getting good at it.

    :-)

    Lifey

  6. Default

    So, Re: sleeping in my Yaris:

    It IS a subcompact. I have the sedan version. That said, both the driver and passenger seats recline down to flat. I'm 5'2 (if rather stout) and this is generally enough space for me BUT the rear seats do fold down permitting access to the trunk. With a memory foam topper over the folded back seat, it's a sight more comfortable than the terrifying hotel I spent a night at in Denver ;)

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    7,169

    Default Go for Hostels

    Quote Originally Posted by Bre.Kidman View Post
    ... it's a sight more comfortable than the terrifying hotel I spent a night at in Denver ;)
    Pity you did not choose to stay in one of the excellent hostels to be found in Denver.

    I stayed at a great hostel in Denver, right in the main drag with overnight street parking in the front. Six bed dorm with just three of us, en suite bathroom, fridge and microwave as well as TV in the room - $19.00.

    Check in Seattle if the HI hostel is operating again. That was the best hostel at which I ever stayed. They had to vacate their building when the owner redeveloped, and were looking for a new location.

    Lifey

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