Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    irish2171 Guest

    Default CB Radio (handheld)

    Need some info on CB's. My family and I travel back home about once or twice a month (four hour trip one way). We can travel a major interstate two-thirds of the way, and the last third is a decent state highway. During the summer months it seems like we are constantly getting caught up in traffic due to accidents. To our dissapointment it's usually too late to go an alternate route by the time we find out. Not to mention the ice and snow in the winter is a real driving *$#%^$#@. I thought if we purchased a CB that it might be helpful, but I'm not like "commander gadget" and don't want to mount a cb radio in our SUV. Our SUV has a navigation system and Onstar, but it doesn't provide any valuable help in advance. Would a CB radio be any help with our situation? Would a handheld type work? What is the "best" make and model? Should we be looking at some other device?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default I use one every time

    Quote Originally Posted by irish2171
    Need some info on CB's.
    I use a handheld every roadtrip I go (just back after a 2 night/3 day trip 1010 miles). Here is some info.

  3. #3
    RoadTripper Brad Guest

    Default

    I currently use a Midland 720 Mini Mobil CB radio. This one is quite nice, because you can either run it off of standard AAA batteries, rechargeable batteries that fit into the radio's own charger unit (they charge inside the battery case, you just plug in an adapter), or, for optimum performance, drop off the Ruber Duck antenna and the battery pack and slide on the car adapter. The adapter splits at one point, one cord you use to plug into your cigarette lighter plug, and the other you attach any sort of single-prong antenna (I use a magnet mount antenna for my car.)

    I have it set up this way because I couldn't afford to have one professionally installed, and I like having the "hot swap" ability (if I am riding with a friend, I just unplug the adapter, pull the magnet mount CB off the roof, Plop it on their car (with permission), and bingo, I am still CB connected.)

    I am helping my friend move from Washington in October, and I will be brining my Mini Mobile with me and my antenna, plus a second one as his moving-away gift, since he will have to drive his car down while I drive the moving van.
    Here's midland's updated version of what I have: http://www.midlandradio.com/comersus...idProduct=3108
    I have the 75-820, and the one they will begin selling soon is above.

    -Brad M.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default "Palm Units"

    Quote Originally Posted by Cascadia4-brad m
    I currently use a Midland 720 Mini Mobil CB radio.
    Brad,

    I used a first-generation Cobra "palm-sized" CB and it was terrible and I have never been tempted to go back to one. But that little Midland looks pretty good. The hand-held I use is the Cobra 38WXST -- it is a bit awkward to balance in one's lap, but I think it is a more powerful receiver.

    How good is the weather feature on the Midland? I use the one on the Cobra just about every day. -- The Cobra version of the Midland 720 is the 75WXST and I may have to give it a try again. What went into your decision to purchase the Midland?

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Sedenquist; 08-22-2005 at 12:11 PM.

  5. #5
    RoadTripper Brad Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Editor
    Brad,
    How good is the weather feature on the Midland? I use the one on the Cobra just about every day. -- The Cobra version of the Midland 720 is the 75WXST and I may have to give it a try again. What went into your decision to purchase the Midland?
    Mark
    I looked at my receiver, and realized its a 75-820 (I thought it was a 720).

    The weather function on the Midland 75-820 is great, and that is using either the rubber duck antenna and battery pack or the car adapter and a magnet mount antenna. It's a one button press to switch from CB to WX (weather), which makes it great while driving. On my last road trip through the Payson and Camp Verde area, I was switching back and fourth between WX and CB, keeping an eye on the massive thunderstorm that was enroute to sideswipe my route. The information from the NWS really didn't help, but I was able to get both Phoenix NWS and Flagstaff NWS loud and clear.

    What went into my decision to get it are a few things: Price (it was only about $100.00), ease of installation (plug and go), ease of use (it's great having all my controlls right on the mic, rather than in some awkward mounted place), and the fact that when I reach a destination, I don't have to leave my CB behind, I can carry it (and it's WX function) with me into stores, work, etc. When I get to work and we have approaching storms, I just disconnect the receiver from my car, pop on the battery pack and the rubber duck antenna, and I now have constant connection to NWS updates right at my desk, without having to find a electrical outlet. I also will frequently take it in when I go grocery shopping during the monsoons, letting the WX function stay on at a low volume while I do my shopping, keeping updated on the latest info outside. That feature (the ability to go from "optimum efficiency" car mount, to less efficient, but adequate mobile use, is what I find the best feature that I found out AFTER I purchased it.

    For roadtrippers, the ability to go from vehicle to mobile means you can take the CB into the motel room, campground, or if you decide to go for a little hike on a trail, you have communications with you.

    I hope to get another mini-mobile for my friend's car soon, and a good antenna for my base station (it's currently out of order, since my only antenna is on my car), I hope to do a good portion of communications by radio.

    I haven't been able to find the Midland 75-820 through the place I bought it from last year (Fry's Electronics) or midland's website, but they are coming out with a newer edition later this fall (the 75-822).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Gosh, Brad...thanks for explaining this model's features. I love the portability of it and would give up a tad bit of reception for this mobility. When I get ready to purchase, this is definitely a model I'll consider (or the updated version). Thanks!

  7. #7

    Default

    I have a Uniden PC68Elite mounted in my car, but I also have an extra radio with a magnetic-mount antenna that I give to fellow travelers if we're going on a long drive together. I put a cigarette lighter adapter on the power cable and it works decently well. The radio (Cobra 19 Ultra II) is old and has seen a lot of use as it was my only CB when I had my Jeep Wrangler, and it's starting to work less than perfectly.

    If you don't need any bells and whistles, you can get a good setup for about $100-150. The only two things that you really need are a radio and a magnetic-mount antenna. I am partial to Uniden radios, so I would recommend the Pro 510XL. My mag-mount that I mentioned above is from Radio Shack and it works well. I believe it was under $40. A very popular and high quality line of mag-mount antennas is the Wilson L'il Wil, 500, or 1000.

    The 12V cigarette lighter adapter that you can splice to the power lead of the radio is a couple of dollars at any auto parts store.

    I know that you don't want to mount a radio in your car, but you can get away with tucking the small transceiver between the seats or lay it on the center console.
    I hope your skin is thick so that you can stand to listen to the truck drivers :) Good luck and have fun with it!

  8. #8
    rafster Guest

    Default

    Can I use an older 23 channel radio on the road? I've got a hand me down here. In addition, I'm a licensed ham radio operator and I should bring my 2 meter mobile radio whenever I hit the road for company.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default Short Answer: Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by rafster
    Can I use an older 23 channel radio on the road? I've got a hand me down here. In addition, I'm a licensed ham radio operator and I should bring my 2 meter mobile radio whenever I hit the road for company.
    If you are a HAM than you will have the sideband on your 2 meter radio which is where most professional truckers hang out. For the rest of us, Ch 19 is still the channel of choice for nearly all east-west traffic and a goodly portion of north/south too.

    Mark

  10. #10

    Default

    My radio rarely leaves channel 19. If I am traveling with another driver borrowing my mag-mount setup, I usually use a channel in the 20's, but that is probably only a handful of times a year.

Similar Threads

  1. CB radio vs. GMRS/ FRS ?
    By fredmau in forum Gear-Up!
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-01-2005, 09:04 PM
  2. My CB radio installation
    By Boston Wrangler in forum Gear-Up!
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 04-26-2005, 07:39 PM
  3. XM Radio
    By CT Roadtripper in forum Gear-Up!
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-20-2004, 08:31 AM
  4. HAM Radio
    By Mark Sedenquist in forum How to Connect On the Road
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-31-2000, 01:16 AM
  5. Professional Driver and Radio Tech is Looking for a Job
    By in forum Working & Living on the road
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-01-1970, 12:00 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • Find the Perfect Hotel
    Search RoadTrip Motels
    Enter city name

    Loading...



  • MORE STORIES