Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. Default From Maine to New Mexico

    New poster here. I am travelling with my college-age son to New Mexico from the coast of Maine in mid July. We have a week. I am eager to get away from the East (been there, done that) as soon as possible, and then I am looking for interstate or straightish routes that convey a real scenic sense of the place--farm country, big skies, great plains scenery, mountain vistas, whatever. We can go north and dip down, or straight across, or dip down and go west on a more southerly route.

    I would also like to find a route with the least trucks, because they scare me.

    Any suggestions for classic American scenery on the way west?

    Thanks!

    Margaret from Maine

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,059

    Default Trucks Keep on Rolllin'

    Quote Originally Posted by mcreight
    New poster here.
    Welcome to the Forum.
    I am travelling with my college-age son to New Mexico from the coast of Maine in mid July. We have a week. I am eager to get away from the East (been there, done that) as soon as possible, and then I am looking for interstate or straightish routes that convey a real scenic sense of the place--farm country, big skies, great plains scenery, mountain vistas, whatever. ...
    I would also like to find a route with the least trucks, because they scare me.
    Well, I can't help with the trucks -- trucks keep the USA economy on a roll and just about every highway in America has plenty of trucks -- especially the Interstate highways. But for the great plains and mountain vistas it is hard to beat I-70 and then US-24 to US-285 to Santa Fe and wherever your destination is in New Mexico.

    Mark

  3. Default Yeah, I guess I can't avoid trucks...

    But thanks for the route information. I am indeed headed to Santa Fe. I am also an historian, and teach a course on the American West. I was considering the Rte 66 itinerary, but from what I can gather, it's slow going, even if funky and historic. And then going through the Oklahoma panhandle in July when I don't like thunderheads... hmmm.

    Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,059

    Default Route 66

    Quote Originally Posted by mcreight
    I am indeed headed to Santa Fe. I am also an historian, and teach a course on the American West. I was considering the Rte 66 itinerary, but from what I can gather, it's slow going, even if funky and historic. And then going through the Oklahoma panhandle in July when I don't like thunderheads... hmmm.
    Tornado Alley as it is known is basically the swath of states from northern Texas to southern Minnesota and the probability of seeing large thunderstorms in any section of this area of the country in July is over 80% With respect to Route 66 -- Guy Randall's site is one of the best and gives a good pictorial look at what is required to drive it.

    Since you only have a week to make the trip, I would not suggest trying to drive too much on two-lane highways -- it will be very slow going. If it were me, I would drive the northern edge of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie on Canadian 401 (gorgeous road) to Toledo -- zap across the turnpike to Chicago and take I-55 to St. Louis. Do the Arch! Every history teacher should do this!

    I would then take I-70 to Denver and take the Trail Ridge Road over the Rocky Mountains National Park and then weave my way south through the Colorado Rockies. A favorite place in northern New Mexico is Eagle's Nest near Taos. In particular, Angel Fire.

    There are hundreds of posts on this forum about routes in Colorado and New Mexico. Enjoy!

    Mark

  5. Default Recommendations for a western historian

    I'd get thee to Independence, MO, and follow the route of the Santa Fe Trail. Along the way, I'd make a side trip to Sand Creek (near Chivington, CO, appropriately enough), and Bent's Old Fort. Once in New Mexico, be sure to work your way down to Fort Sumner and Lincoln County -- arm yourself ahead of time with Mr. Utley's book High Noon in Lincoln .

    Also, you can get a sense of railroad history in the southwest by taking a ride on the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railway -- from either end -- Chama, NM or Antonito, CO. The rails played a major role in mining and development of the west -- plus -- riding the C&TSRR is just plain old fun. Fun is a historical thing too.

    On this route, you'll get everything you asked for, scenery-wise!

    I don't know though, how can you NOT love a good thunderstorm!
    Last edited by Mark Sedenquist; 06-14-2005 at 06:51 PM. Reason: Add a link

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,059

    Default I agree!

    Quote Originally Posted by Moderator Bob
    I don't know though, how can you NOT love a good thunderstorm!
    I agree. I always head for those big super cells. Here is a new book I just reviewed that examines the behavior/motivation of other Big Weather Chasers.

  7. Default Okay, so I don't love tornadoes

    But what are you supposed to do if you are a bit of a wuss with an anvil shaped cloud as it moves toward you and the sky turns green? Also, what if you can't see the darn thing? I remember driving from NM to Chicago years ago at night, with a tornado warning issued, not knowing what to do when all I could see was lightning flashing like a strobe!

    And thanks for the Great Plains, CO/NM/ scenic/historical suggestions.

  8. Default Playing the odds

    If it were night with a tornado warning issued and seemingly imminent, I might hole up for the night somewhere -- but in MOST cases, I'd probably keep going. I think the odds that you'd find yourself in the actual path of the tornado at the right (or maybe the WRONG) moment are pretty slim, really.

    That said, I no longer court lightning as I used to. I discovered that the human body is fairly attractive to that particular phenomenon (we're great conductors, I hear), so I no longer climb the local mountains or dance in the streets in the midst of electrical storms. This is my sole concession to a prospective wiser old age. A person is a little safer in a car though... Bob

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,059

    Default I have been caught twice

    Quote Originally Posted by mcreight
    But what are you supposed to do if you are a bit of a wuss with an anvil shaped cloud as it moves toward you and the sky turns green? Also, what if you can't see the darn thing? I remember driving from NM to Chicago years ago at night, with a tornado warning issued, not knowing what to do when all I could see was lightning flashing like a strobe!
    I have been caught twice by life-threatening tornadoes -- the second time I really thought it was all over and, in fact, several people were killed nearby. Three pieces of advice that can save your life:

    1) Never EVER stop under an over-pass if you are threatened. Vortex winds under an overpass can exceed the straight-line winds and suck you into a tornado.

    2) If you are caught, out in the open -- find a ditch, get as low as you can and cover your face and neck. In most cases, the tornado will jump over your location.

    3) In 95%+ of storms the dangerous weather will track from the southwest to the northeast. If you move to the northwest or to the southeast you will be going away from the dangerous storm cells.

    If you are close enough to see a tornado -- count your lucky stars -- a lot of people pay big $$ to see one. The two that nearly killed me were way too close to see the funnel cloud. I was in the middle of the cloud -- in the kill zone -- even with a GPS/compass I couldn't begin to tell where I was and which way to go. I will never forget that sound. The entire ground was thumping and... well, you get the gist...

  10. Default So let me get this straight

    You are on an interstate-- threatened by a funnel cloud-- and you DON'T get out of the car and climb up into the little crevice under the overpass? I swear I've seen photos of people who were saved by that little hideout.

    Live and learn-- guess the main thing to do is get off that interstate ASAP.

    I realize that this is not mainline roadtrip info, or a likely scenario except for funnel-lovers, but thanks anyway for the tip.

Similar Threads

  1. Maine road trip
    By Quebec Gen in forum RoadTrip Field Reports
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-14-2005, 07:45 PM
  2. Brit needs advise Cali to Maine.
    By roadtripper101 in forum Planning Summer RoadTrips
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-15-2005, 12:36 PM
  3. Mexico caravan, Apr/May '05
    By Bill Doyle in forum Off the Beaten Path
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-24-2004, 02:50 PM
  4. North Maine Woods/Allagash Wilderness
    By TripTik Man in forum Planning Summer RoadTrips
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-17-2003, 08:21 PM
  5. maine coast
    By justagirl in forum Off the Beaten Path
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-31-2002, 07:59 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • Find the Perfect Hotel
    Search RoadTrip Motels
    Enter city name

    Loading...



  • MORE STORIES