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  1. #1
    obgirl Guest

    Default traveling with a dog advice

    Hi,
    I was wondering if anyone had any previous experiences with traveling with a dog on a two week roadtrip. My boyfriend and I will be driving/moving from san diego to baltimore in august, and we our bringing our dog on the road trip. We plan on camping the majority of the time, but just wondering if there were any suggestions to make our trip easier. We have taken him camping several times, but only for a couple of days at the most. Also, would love suggestions for can't miss places on the way!!
    thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default 15 Years of Dog Trips

    I was wondering if anyone had any previous experiences with traveling with a dog on a two week roadtrip. My boyfriend and I will be driving/moving from san diego to baltimore in august, and we our bringing our dog on the road trip. We plan on camping the majority of the time, but just wondering if there were any suggestions to make our trip easier. We have taken him camping several times, but only for a couple of days at the most.
    The first thing that works in your favor, is that you have already taken him on camping trips. Most dogs, (maybe all non-human animals) live in the present and don't seem to notice the passage of time beyond RIGHT NOW. Therefore, in general, a two-week trip doesn't create any more strain than a one day trip.

    When our own road dog companion passed away last year, we wrote an essay about the joys of taking family critters on the road. By all means, do it. Humans can always learn alot about road trips from dogs.

    There are a couple of guide books that are pretty good that deal with places that welcome four-footed travelers.

    Tips, we have learned over those 15+ years of roadtrips with Marvin the Road Dog:
    1. Always carry water and a bowl for quick pit stops. Drink first and then take a quick (or longer) walk on the pit stop. If you do it in reverse, or don't take a walk -- their excitement at stopping could lead to an upchuck experience -- not a good plan.
    2. Bring a bed/toy/towel from home. The smells from home are welcome.
    3. Leash even the best mannered critter on walks -- There are a host of wild things out there that would savor a fresh canine meal.
    4. Always pick up after your buddy.
    5. Check between the foot pads after every walk in an unfamiliar place
    6. Always vacinate for Lyme disease
    7. Carry a complete set of medical records for your dog. Previous medical check-ups can be an invaluable savings of time if something needs to be done in the field.
    8. Follow his/her example and say hello to everyone you meet.

    Mark

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