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  1. #1
    StrangeRoad Guest

    Default Aside from essentials like tent, stove and cooler...what else?

    I've got a fairly complete list of things I know I'll need...I know someone out there will mention something I didn't think of. The trip starts in late July...through Little Rock, over to Oklahoma City, and north from there into Badlands, South Dakota, then onto Yellowstone and down into Colorado and New Mexico.I'll be camping the whole way (hopefully). I also plan on doing some backcountry camping in the aforementioned parks, something I've never done. Any help or suggestions?

  2. #2
    StrangeRoad Guest

    Default Aside from essentials like tent, stove and cooler...what else?

    I've got a fairly complete list of things I know I'll need...I know someone out there will mention something I didn't think of. The trip starts in late July...through Little Rock, over to Oklahoma City, and north from there into Badlands, South Dakota, then onto Yellowstone and down into Colorado and New Mexico.I'll be camping the whole way (hopefully). I also plan on doing some backcountry camping in the aforementioned parks, something I've never done. Any help or suggestions?

  3. #3
    Guest

    Default KISS method

    For road trip camping, the best thing to do is keep it simple. You want to be able to set-up and dismantle with a minimum of fuss and a certain amount of speed. I don't carry the same equipment on a road trip for camping that I would on a "camping trip" -- since I am not likely staying any one place very long.

    A small easily assembled tent (not always used, I sleep "out" whenever I can), sleeping bag, cot, ice chest, a small bathroom-type rug to put my shoes on beside the cot, a plastic tub for a wash basin, towel and wash cloth, toiletries, etc. Also a good flashlight. I carry an extra blanket to line the sleeping bag on any real cold nights, just in case. Five gallon water jug.

    A basic first aid kit with meds for illnesses you are prone to, if any. A small mirror for shaving -- or you can use the side mirrors on your vehicle or your reflection in the glass.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default Agree with KISSing it

    I agree with Bob. Keep it simple. But I do tend to pack a bit more than him...I might cook more on the road than Bob?

    Tent (small, easy up/down style that's good for road-tripping but I wouldn't take it winter camping!), pillow, sleeping bag, self-inflating sleeping pad, blanket, flashlight, small lantern, 1-burner cookstove with small camping-style cookset, basic cooking utensils (spatula, turner, spoon, knife), (I use the largest pot for my wash basin), paper plates/cups, plastic utensils, paper towels, TP, small 12-volt cooler, and 12-volt water heater (great for coffee, soup, etc.), and a towel.

    I usually only carry 1 or 2 old, well-rinsed milk jugs for water as I normally am in some kind of campground so I don't need a large 5-gallon container but if you're doing the backcountry thing you might want the 5-gallons after all.

    I usually take one of those comfy telescoping camp chairs as well. They pack small and are so comfy to relax in. Worth the extra space, IMHO.

    Personal items (toiletries, 1st aid kit)

    To save money on the road, I usually stop at a cheap grocery store (Sam's Club) and raid my pantry before leaving with things like a case of pop, mac 'n cheese, Top Ramen, cheese, crackers, tuna fish, mayo, fruit, pop tarts (I like them better untoasted anyway), granola bars, and bread.

    So, on the road I make sandwiches, occasionally cook the simple meals above if I want a hot meal in the campground, and generally eat the simple things like the granola bars, cheese, fruit, etc. for quick meals for lunch and dinner at nice rest areas where I can stretch my legs. This saves both time and money for other things.


  5. #5
    Guest

    Default Yes

    I don't usually cook on a road trip type camping trip -- my habit is lunch (cold) out of the ice chest (it's fast and no clean-up), but supper is usually a cafe or fast food someplace. Breakfast I almost always eat out as well -- on the road, it is my favorite meal of the day.

    I've gotten used to the larger can of water only because I have been driving pick-ups for quite a few years and have room for it -- the smaller jugs WOULD be better if you are using a smaller vehicle! Bob

  6. #6
    Guest

    Default

    Thanks to the both of you. I never even considered the wash basin thing, not to mention the need for a quick setup/breakdown tent. Goes to show you never really have a complete list even when you're sure you do. I hope to do minimal fast fooding. However, it does seem that stove cooking every night might be a hassle, I guess I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. Thanks again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default Cooking on the road

    I tend to only cook ever other day or so but it's nice to have the ability to do so. I eat mostly sandwiches, granola bars, fruit, cheese/crackers, etc. on the road but I get sick of cold food. It's nice to be able to heat water for instant oatmeal once in awhile!

    At the same time, I really don't think you should consider it a hassle either. Let me give you a great example. I was on a roadtrip caravan last summer with several other cars. They would regularly stop at restaurants. I would often explore the area while they were sitting in the restaurant and meet up with them later. I saw many more things along the way than they did because of this.

    One memorable time I decided I really needed a hot meal. So, while my friends sat in a restaurant, waited for their order, ate, etc., I went to a beautiful rest stop just east of Glenwood Springs, CO, that is situated on a beautiful river. It was a warm, sunny day so, while my friends sat inside, I was outside enjoying the view and the weather. It takes about 2 minutes to set up my small one-burner stove. I made a hamburger, cleaned up, had some yogurt for dessert, and walked a trail leading down to the river, poked around, took some pictures, came back, sat down and relaxed, got out a blanket and napped a bit on the soft grass....and then my friends finally showed up.

    Which of us had more fun? Me or them sitting in a restaurant the whole time? What tiny hassle firing up the stove and cleaning the pan gave me was more than paid off by enjoying a beautiful day in a lovely spot while my friends just sat in a restaurant. I would put up with that hassle for the pay-offs any day. :-)

  8. #8
    Guest

    Default Beautiful spot

    That's the Colorado River (just east of Glenwood Springs along I-70) and it's still in its "tumble over the rocks" mountain stage at that point. That's one of my favorite places!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default Gorgeous

    That was truly one of the best rest stops I've ever stopped at. Gorgeous.

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