Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    USRoadtripper Guest

    Default Women and CB radios

    I read the thread about CB radios with interest. I wonder if women traveling alone have found them to be safe. I ask because although i'm interested in getting one, I wonder if I might attract unwelcome attention. Are there tips that you might pass on for women using CB radios either for casual purposes or to get assistance? Thanks a lot.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default 99% are Lurkers

    It is relatively rare to hear women voices on the CB. But I know that there are hundreds (thousands?) of lurkers. The real value of CB radios is getting the current and local information, so yes I think a CB is "required" equipment on a roadtrip.

    As far as unwelcome attention -- its not like a red light goes off to identify your vehicle -- unless you identify your car on the radio it can be 100% anonymous. On the other hand, bored drivers are always happy to talk to a woman on the CB.

    M.

  3. #3

    Default

    Was that my thread that you read with interest? :)

    As Mark mentioned, a CB is almost something I have to have with me. I turn it on every time I get in the car unless my girlfriend starts getting annoyed by it :)

    It is rare for women to be on the CB radio and the majority of people out there using CBs are truckers, most of whom are men. And when men get together chatting and so forth, you can imagine what the topics of discussion are. Of course, this isn't 100% of the time, but you definitely need moderately thick skin to hang on the trucker channels all day.

    All the time truckers are asking others for help finding certain locations. It's amazing the local information you can find just by keying-up and saying "Breaker 1-9 for local info." And if they hear a female voice, you'll be sure to get directions quickly.

    As with anything, be smart. Use common sense and if you feel threatened you can turn the radio off, find the next police station, or do anything else you would do if you felt unsafe.

    If you would like any advice or aid in setting up a CB in your car, let me know!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default Lingo actually makes sense

    Darrell's post reminds me that CBer lingo may not seem comprehensible to the non-user. So, this a very quick into:

    CB Channels are open (meaning that anyone can speak at any time) such open access could result in chaos unless certain protocols are followed. When someone keys their mike and says "Breaker 1-9"... What they mean is "I would like to break into the conversation on this channel 19" The normal response to this query is "Go Breaker" and then you can make your request or say hello or whatever. It is considered reasonably rude to start yaking on a channel without "asking first." The 10-code (eg: "10-4") is a short-cut voice code often used in some form on the CB.

    M.

  5. #5
    imported_LAURA Guest

    Default got me curious

    After reading this thread I am thirsting for more information on CB's. I am an occasional road tripper and am wondering how useful and entertaining it will be. I often take 5 hour road trips by myself and often get bored.

    How much does a mid-range CB cost? And what should one look for if they are going to purchase one?

    Someone mentioned a CB is a good way to get local information. Is this local information through the truckers and other "CB'ers" in the area? I imagine it's good for traffic information.

    The Editors information on protocol was good, is there a respected website one can go to for more information on proper CB etiquette?

    Thanks
    LAURA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default Look at the CB page on this site

    Laura,

    You have been a busy poster today -- thanks for all of the information about Chicago and Madison!

    You can find a good 40-channel CB (without Single-Side-Band) for about $100. There are plenty available for ~ $50. We have pulled together some good CB resource pages in our Links and Finds section.

    Actually, local information runs the gamut from breaking weather to good motels to directions to specific addresses to "whatever you need".

    Mark

  7. #7

    Default

    I agree with what Mark said.

    Check out www.cbradioforum.com. This site is run by 1StopElectronics.com and they offer a full line of CB radios and are well-respected among the group at the forum, of which many of the members know a lot about CB radios. I am in no way affiliated with that site and have never bought anything from them, but I would trust them with information and also recommendations on equipment and setup.

    I have had good luck on ebay finding good radios for short money. Uniden is a quality brand and you can get a good radio like the PC68XL for $50 or less. You can use it as-is, or have it peaked and tuned by a radio shop for about $25 to increase receive and transmit capabilities. Some coax cable, a mount (permanent or magnetic), and a fiberglass antenna, and you'll be set up for about $100.

    Cobra is a good brand also, but their quality dropped off after the early-mid 1990s when they moved production to China. Cobra used to use Uniden boards in their radios, but not anymore. Now, I think Uniden has a better reputation among the enthusiasts.

    Galaxy and Texas Ranger are a couple other brands, although more expensive with more bells and whistles than you probably care for or understand.

  8. #8

    Default

    Look on Google for "CB Radio "10" Codes".

    If you want to see some pictures of the CB setup in my 91 Mazda Protege, <a href="http://www.salisburystreet.com/pictures/cb" target="new">click here</a>.

  9. #9

    Default

    &gt; Laura,<BR>
    &gt; <BR>
    &gt; You have been a busy poster today -- <BR>
    &gt; thanks for all of the information about Chicago <BR>
    &gt; and Madison!<BR>
    &gt; <BR>
    &gt; You can find a good 40-channel CB <BR>
    &gt; (without Single-Side-Band) for about $100. There <BR>
    &gt; are plenty available for ~ $50. We have pulled <BR>
    &gt; together some good CB resource pages in our Links <BR>
    &gt; and Finds section. Check out: _a href = <BR>
    &gt; "http://www.roadtripamerica.com/dashboarding/vehic <BR>
    &gt; les.htm#tel"_the CBer stuff_/a_.<BR>
    &gt; <BR>
    &gt; Actually, <BR>
    &gt; local information runs the gamut from breaking <BR>
    &gt; weather to good motels to directions to specific <BR>
    &gt; addresses to "whatever you need".<BR>
    &gt; <BR>
    &gt; Mark <BR>
    <BR>

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default What is that?

    Darrell,

    What is being shown in image #16 -- some kind of a ground?

    Same question for #27?

    Clever putting the transceiver on an angle.

    Thanks for the photos.

    Mark

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • Find the Perfect Hotel
    Search RoadTrip Motels
    Enter city name

    Loading...



  • MORE STORIES