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  1. Default Driving to Nova Scotia from NY in winter

    I have been recently considering the idea of driving up to Nova Scotia (specifically cape brenton area) to visit my relatives this upcoming January for a short visit. However, I have never driven to Canada before and am unsure of the quality of the roads there, as well as the typical weather conditions during the middle of winter (being that I do not own a car with 4-wheel drive). I am also typically pressed on time with my career, so I was planning to complete the roughly 1000 mile drive in a single day. I have independently taken other long trips by car under similar conditions in the past (2.5 days from NY to Las Vegas, and less than one day to Florida from NY). I guess my main concern is whether the roads up there are comparable to the interstate system in the US (in terms of travel speed), and if the conditions are known to deteriorate quickly with inclement weather. If I were to go, I would also most likely be traveling solo. I am familiar with the route on i95 north up to Bangor, ME, but am unfamiliar with the best route to take after that point. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,075

    Default

    I would definitely rethink this trip, for a couple of reasons, and give considerations to flying and rent a car when you're there if you're pressed for time. While you said you've done similar things with your trip to Vegas and Florida, this is not something we recommend or condone at RTA, for safety reasons.

    The journey of 1000 miles, solo, is a two-day drive, not a single day. Even on US interstates, 600 miles is about the maximum anyone person should do, and only by people with experience in driving long distances. Otherwise, stick to 500-550 miles in a day.

    You're going to have a border crossing in two directions. Allow an hour for the crossing, though you may find it's a lot faster. Friends of ours just returned from a road trip to the Maritimes, and said they crossed the border in two places and it was 30 minutes one place, an hour in another one. You do have a passport, correct? It's now needed unless you have an enhanced driver's license (most people don't have this unless they regularly cross the border into Canada or Mexico).

    As far as the route to take from the end of I-95, NB 95 will take you to the Trans-Canada Hwy 2 across New Brunswick. Then take TCH 104 into Nova Scotia. If you can get a Rand McNally atlas, it includes NB and the Maritimes. If you're a member of AAA, you can go get maps for free, as part of your membership.



    Donna

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DonnaR57 View Post
    I would definitely rethink this trip, for a couple of reasons, and give considerations to flying and rent a car when you're there if you're pressed for time. While you said you've done similar things with your trip to Vegas and Florida, this is not something we recommend or condone at RTA, for safety reasons.

    The journey of 1000 miles, solo, is a two-day drive, not a single day. Even on US interstates, 600 miles is about the maximum anyone person should do, and only by people with experience in driving long distances. Otherwise, stick to 500-550 miles in a day.

    You're going to have a border crossing in two directions. Allow an hour for the crossing, though you may find it's a lot faster. Friends of ours just returned from a road trip to the Maritimes, and said they crossed the border in two places and it was 30 minutes one place, an hour in another one. You do have a passport, correct? It's now needed unless you have an enhanced driver's license (most people don't have this unless they regularly cross the border into Canada or Mexico).

    As far as the route to take from the end of I-95, NB 95 will take you to the Trans-Canada Hwy 2 across New Brunswick. Then take TCH 104 into Nova Scotia. If you can get a Rand McNally atlas, it includes NB and the Maritimes. If you're a member of AAA, you can go get maps for free, as part of your membership.



    Donna
    Thanks for your response. I would personally much rather fly given my short time frame for the trip (5-6 days), but the nearest city I could fly to with reasonable airfare (Halifax) is still over 5 hours away from my destination. I also have a passport in reference to your question.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
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    8,836

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    You would still be much better off flying to Halifax and renting a car. If you take a morning flight, you should be able to drive 5 hours after you land - and the same with an afternoon flight back.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
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    I agree with glc. When my husband and I only have a week (or less) to go see family far away, we fly out early in the morning, rent a car, then drive the 4 hours to get to family. It makes for a long day, but it's far safer than trying to drive 1000 miles in a day.



    Donna

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    12,462

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    It really never ceases to amaze when people come on this forum and say are worried about something as insignificant as the weather, and a nearly irrelevant feature like four wheel drive, when have already made it clear that do not care even a little bit about safety and have every intent on endangering themselves and every one else on the road.

    As we told you previously, driving 1000 miles a day is extremely dangerous, but it's clear you have ignored those facts, and because you didn't kill someone, you're now bragging about it and treating it as if somehow it proves you are capable of doing it. Let's make things perfectly clear, just like a repeated drunk driver (and yes, your previous drives were every bit as dangerous as someone driving drunk) might make it home safe, it doesn't mean they weren't a danger and it doesn't mean their luck won't eventually run out. Hopefully it won't take you killing someone else before you understand just how reckless you've been and are planning to continue to be in the future.

    In terms of road conditions in Canada, you'll have freeway quality roads through New Brunswick, although speed limits are usually lower at 100 km/hr (62 mph) it's mostly two lane roads through Nova Scotia, with them being quite curvy as you get to Cape Breton, and probably quite challenging in winter with things like freezing fog, as many roads are quite close to the water. (that should be quite fun when are driving long past the point of any humans physical limits).
    Last edited by Midwest Michael; 10-17-2016 at 05:19 AM.

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