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  1. Default Raleigh, NC to Mesa Verde National Park, CO

    This summer we are planning on a Trip from Raleigh out west and back. We have planned on about 21 days and are pulling our travel trailer staying at different spots along the way. My initial thought was to go north and through St.Louis on the way out and then come South to I-40 on the way back. We have reservations at a RV park for for 7 days in CO. I figured that gives us 7 days out and 7 days back. I am new to this type of planning so any tips or ideas will be greatly appreciated.

    Some ideas of things I would like to see.
    1. The arch in St. Louis. - I have heard there are some troubles with this.
    2. Graceland in Memphis.
    3. The Great Sand Dunes National Park.

    What things are around I-70 on the way out in Kansas or Missouri? We are thinking that there will be at least a few overnights in those states as we will likely be tired of driving. Also would it be just as interesting in those states to take a state road rather than I-70?

    I have the same questions about I-40 between New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

    I look forward to this discussion.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    6,936

    Default Getting started.

    Hello and Welcome to the Great American Roadtrip Forum.

    I am new to this type of planning so any tips or ideas will be greatly appreciated.
    By far your best bet will be to follow the advice in this paragraph:-

    Quote Originally Posted by AZBuck
    Start with maps. Not GPS, not software, not Google, but real honest-to-god paper maps that show you your entire route, that you can mark up (and erase), that you can stick pins in, and that show something about the land you'll be driving through. Those are your essential tool in any RoadTrip planning process. Start by marking all the places you know you want to visit. Then connect the dots. Then look for more places of interest and scenic routes along the lines connecting the dots. Repeat until you've got as many sites and roads as you think you want.
    Good maps are available at AAA (free to members) or you may prefer a road atlas such as Rand McNally. These maps have a wealth of information on them, besides the cities and towns along the way. There are the interstates and secondary highways, most back roads and highlight scenic routes. Most, if not all attractions along the way are also marked on the route, historical, natural as well as touristy. If you are looking at staying in more natural surroundings on your way there and back, public land campgrounds are generally marked by a small triangle.

    You will see so much more than you ever will within the confines of a small screen.

    Maps are not only invaluable during the planning, they are essential on the road. Don't be tempted to rely solely on your electronics. Many have done so at their peril - some fatal.

    Enjoy the planning.

    Lifey

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lifemagician View Post
    Hello and Welcome to the Great American Roadtrip Forum.



    By far your best bet will be to follow the advice in this paragraph:-



    Good maps are available at AAA (free to members) or you may prefer a road atlas such as Rand McNally. These maps have a wealth of information on them, besides the cities and towns along the way. There are the interstates and secondary highways, most back roads and highlight scenic routes. Most, if not all attractions along the way are also marked on the route, historical, natural as well as touristy. If you are looking at staying in more natural surroundings on your way there and back, public land campgrounds are generally marked by a small triangle.

    You will see so much more than you ever will within the confines of a small screen.

    Maps are not only invaluable during the planning, they are essential on the road. Don't be tempted to rely solely on your electronics. Many have done so at their peril - some fatal.

    Enjoy the planning.

    Lifey
    Thank you for your comments. I happen to love maps as we do a lot of trail rides looking for dirt or fire roads. I will have to say that I already have Gazetteers for all the states that are on our path. Not only for the main route planning but also for excursions when I get a wild hair.

    My personal thought was to spend some or a lot of the time away from the interstate so I can really see the area that we are driving through. we spend so much time driving 75 or 80 mph through areas and don't really get to see the mom and pop stores and real towns that exists in our trips.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,545

    Default

    1. The arch in St. Louis. - I have heard there are some troubles with this.
    You will want to check the Gateway Arch website just before you leave on your trip, to get the latest information. Right now the interior of the Arch is closed, with projected reopening on March 4th. The grounds and museum are under rehabilitation/remodeling. I will say that you should leave your travel trailer somewhere else when you visit the Arch. Parking was never great there anyway, but with a travel trailer in tow, probably near impossible.


    Donna

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