Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Default Drive from New York to Boston

    My husband and I are coming to the US next year in April (we're from Australia) and am wanting to drive from New York to Boston. We originally looked at getting the amtrak but the acela express doesn't do checked luggage so that went out the window. I like the idea of driving anyways...being able to see the country side and some small towns. The rest of our trip is all big cities. So my question is...is anyone able to provide me with a good route to take from NY to Boston? I have looked it up on google maps and it may show the direct route but I still would like to see some beautiful scenery and avoid congested roads. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default With an Emphasis on the Bright and Beautiful

    Welcome aboard the RoadTrip America Forums!

    All software-based mapping routines will send you on basically the same route: I-95 to New Haven CT, I-81 to Hartford, I-84 to central Massachusetts, and I-90 the rest of the way. It's direct and 'efficient' (I guess) but it will hardly soothe the soul or give you a taste of small towns or beautiful scenery and WILL send you down some very congested roads. Fortunately there are other options.

    You will need to start by leaving New York City to the north in order to have any hope of clearing the urbanized area within an hour of departure. Your best bet is to use the Hutchinson River Parkway up to I-684 north. Then where it intersects with I-84, instead, continue north on NY-22. Around Wingdale NY, use NY-55/CT-55 to cross over into Connecticut and get on US-7 north. Continue on that (Check out the covered bridge in West Cornwall CT) on up into Massachusetts and the Berkshires. The easiest way into Boston from there would just be to follow US-20 (with occasional jumps onto the Mass Pike (I-90, toll) through cities such as Springfield and the western suburbs of Boston.

    The upside is that such a drive would be very scenic and take you through a number of small towns, and for the most part the roads really shouldn't be very crowded in April. The down side is that there's a reason software mapping routines don't send you on such roads. They're relatively time consuming. You'd need to spend at least six hours driving plus any time spent out of the car to stroll through a few of the towns and parks you'll be passing. But still, you can get to Boston in a day with an early start and without pushing too hard. For my money that makes it worth it.

    AZBuck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    Another option is take the Taconic State Parkway north to NY-23, then take it and MA-23 to US-7 at Great Barrington. Take that north all the way to Williamstown, then MA-2 all the way in to Boston. You would be looking at 7 hours or more but it should be quite scenic and relaxed.

    How you would get to the Taconic depends on exactly where in NYC you will be leaving from.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    6,936

    Default My favourite route.

    Yet another option would be to take US-7 north to Great Barrington (I am not fond of the Taconic State Parkway, though it is very scenic and there is no commercial traffic on it), Pick up MA-23 east, which is a wonderful route, to where it merges with US-20 at Woonoco. US-20 through Palmer and on to Sturbridge is also a great scenicl drive. If you have time it is worthwhile to visit old Sturbridge village.

    Depending on your timeline, you can pick up I-84 at that point, which will take you onto the MassPike/I-90 (toll) which will take you into Boston.

    However, I much prefer to continue on US-20 to where it intersects with MA-9 just north of Westborough, and follow route 9 east all the way into Boston. It is a four lane divided road all the way. It does get busy at certain times of the day, just as all the alternatives do, including the MassPike.

    One of the charms of driving through the Boston suburbs is the complete absence of large shopping centres and big box stores, once you have passed Natick. The shopfronts along the roads are mostly locally owned, very few chains, and offer a wide range of unique merchandise. (Can be frustrating when you are looking for a Target or a K mart.)

    Lifey

  5. Default

    Thanks everyone. At this point all these roads mean nothing to me but once i start looking into it a bit more i might be able to map out where we are going.

    Are they all highways in between the cities and is it easy to get onto each road?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    6,936

    Default Get some good maps.

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah-m View Post
    Thanks everyone. At this point all these roads mean nothing to me but once i start looking into it a bit more i might be able to map out where we are going.

    Are they all highways in between the cities and is it easy to get onto each road?
    Sarah, one of the very best things you can do right now, to help you, is get yourself a Rand McNally road atlas. They are invaluable for the information they have. It will make everything much more clear to you than any computer based mapping program. (Click on atlases and maps. The 2015 edition is US$10.64 - you'll have it in two or three weeks.)

    You are going to need paper maps when you are on the road, anyway, so may as well get it to help you plan.

    Are you a member of RACV or NRMA or similar? If you are, be sure to take your membership with you. It will give you access to free maps and tourism information from the AAA. You can pick up extra detailed maps while in NYC, especially a detailed map of Boston. I could not cope without mine. I'd give you mine, but I left it in my van in NC.

    Don't be tempted to rely on a satnav, they are notoriously unreliable..... just like at home.

    Lifey

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default Just to Reassure You

    American roads are generally very well marked with Interstate (Red and Blue shields), US (black and white shields), and state (various shapes) highway numbers prominently displayed along with direction arrows, distances to the next town(s), and notices of parks and other attractions along the way. If you know the numbers (or in a few cases, names) of the roads you want to follow, doing so should not prove to be a problem in the real world. But as Lifey points out, there is nothing you need more at this stage of your planning than a good atlas or other set of paper maps to get an overall view of where you'll be going. Besides, those paper maps often highlight scenic roads (usually with a green dashed line alongside), local parks, historic sites, and campgrounds, as well as the names of all the towns they pass through so that you can do a little research before you actually get there.

    AZBuck

Similar Threads

  1. Washington DC to Boston - 4 day drive - September 2012
    By baloobear in forum Fall & Winter RoadTrips
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-01-2012, 10:29 AM
  2. Boston to Jacksonville FL - how to make a long drive into a fun road trip
    By littlesurfchick in forum Fall & Winter RoadTrips
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-30-2010, 06:28 PM
  3. Tourist needs help: New York to Niagara Falls to Boston to New York
    By BerlinBerlin in forum Fall & Winter RoadTrips
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-30-2010, 04:36 PM
  4. New York to Seattle w/ Dog: What to Drive and How to Go?
    By xc100 in forum Fall & Winter RoadTrips
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-01-2006, 05:05 AM
  5. New York to Miami drive
    By liammwilliams in forum Planning Summer RoadTrips
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-05-2006, 09:30 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • Find the Perfect Hotel
    Search RoadTrip Motels
    Enter city name

    Loading...



  • MORE STORIES