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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Hillsborough, New Hampshire, United States
    Posts
    5

    Default road trip with grandkids

    Hi everyone;
    I'm trying to plan a road trip for this summer with my 2 Grand kids,17 year old and 15 year old.We're thinking of driving from N.H. to South Carolina.Any suggestions on the best route,places to stay or anything else that would help us.
    I'm thinking of a two week trip.Our last trip we stayed in motel 6 most of the time( we drove to Virginia beach)we did take a tent but never used it.
    I would love to take a lot of back roads and really take it slow.Maybe drive along the coast?Anything interesting along the way worth stopping to see?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    Welcome!

    Assuming this is a round trip, you could go along the coast in one direction and go inland the other direction.

    Along the coast, the only real hassle will be getting around the NYC area - but you could head for Albany, then take the NY Thruway, I-287, and the Garden State Parkway to the Jersey Shore, getting off as desired, to Cape May, then the ferry across to Delaware. The Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel will dump you off into Virginia Beach, then farther south you could go down the Outer Banks through Cape Hatteras and take 2 ferries - first one to Ocracoke then the second back to the mainland.

    On the way back, you can take I-26 up towards the Smokies, then the Blue Ridge Parkway and Skyline Drive into northern VA, then follow the I-81/I-88 corridor back to Albany then home. If the kids are boys and/or baseball fans, that would take you near the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown.

    Are you doing all the driving, or is the 17 year old going to help?

    Anything between NH and NYC is something you can do on a weekend trip, hence my recommendation to get over to Albany and take the Interstates to get past NYC.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default A Little More Detail

    The coastal and inland routes that glc recommends are laid out here in a little more detail and with some major attractions listed. Almost by definition there are no 'back roads' along the coast. But a few suggestions for a back way from DC to Boston were given in reply to this request. If there are specific things that you or your grandchildren would like to see, or interests you would like to indulge, let us know and we'll more than likely know of a spot or two more or less on the way.

    AZBuck

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Hillsborough, New Hampshire, United States
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you for all the great suggestions!I love the idea of taking the coast down and inland back home.
    I will be the only driver,but I plan on taking my time,maybe 8 hours driving a day with many stops.
    Does anyone know if I could set my GPS to go the coastal route, or where i can map this out and print ?
    The kids and I love the beach, amusement parks,I would love to take them to the Amish .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    You can map it out right here using our Map Center (green toolbar at the top of the page) and/or with Google Maps. The Map Center will also show you a lot of points of interest near the route. There is also no substitute for paper maps and/or a road atlas. A GPS is going to require a lot of manually entered legs and we caution against sole reliance on such a device.

    The inland route on the way back will take you very close to Amish country and Hersheypark. The coastal route on the way down is pretty close to Six Flags Great Adventure.

    The only thing you need to be aware of is time. 2 weeks is plenty, but going by fastest Interstate direct route from Manchester to Charleston, driving 8 hours a day, would take you 2.5 days each way. Getting off the Interstates and taking the secondary roads will add to this quite quickly. Choose your diversions carefully.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default Remember: GPSs Do One Thing and One Thing Only

    GPS units sold to the public invariably are programmed to do exactly one thing. To get you from where you are to where you want to go by the 'best' route possible. Unlike human advisors (like us) who will tell you that there is no such thing as a 'best' route, silicon chip based advisors assume that there is and that they know it. They will invariably try to put you on the roads that result in the shortest drive time to your destination. But you may not want such roads because of their traffic, tolls, lack of scenic interest or other considerations. So - what to do?

    Many GPS units will allow you the option to express a preference for "no tolls", or some such, but that's really not a lot of help. Honestly, the only way to make the GPS give you the routes you want is to know what those routes are ahead of time (pre-planning) and to program in as many way points as are necessary to keep your GPS following the routes you want. This may require frequent resetting while driving. That's were your grandchildren will come in handy. Make sure they know how to program your GPS and then have whichever one of them is in the front seat act as navigator/programmer. The more you leave the choice of route up to the GPS, the more you're going to end up doing what it wants rather than what you want.

    I have described visiting the Amish of southeastern Pennsylvania several times, most recently here. I used to live in the area and have known and worked with several Amish and Mennonite people. They really would prefer that outsiders such as you and I simply left them alone, so while I applaud your desire to show your grandchildren that there are other ways to live besides our modern technology-dependent approach, remember that the Amish are not on display.

    AZBuck
    Last edited by AZBuck; 04-27-2013 at 04:41 PM. Reason: Fixed link

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    This is the best article I have seen about "visiting the Amish" and appropriate etiquette.
    Last edited by AZBuck; 04-27-2013 at 04:41 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Hillsborough, New Hampshire, United States
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you for all the great advice!
    AZbuck..i do understand the Amish are not on display,i really enjoy their restaurants,and food..shoofly pie !!
    I have been trying to map out this trip but i'm having a hard time.I don't know how to add the routes I want to take..can someone help me please? I really need step be step direction..I wish I could just program my GPS :(

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,546

    Default

    I'd really recommend getting good maps or a road atlas. If you are a member of AAA, you can get freebie maps of every state before you go. Once you have laid out your route, take a highlighter and trace it. If you're a AAA member, you can also get Triptiks either by going to a local office or ordering them online. The Triptiks will take your route in 100-200 mile segments. (Warning: AAA doesn't have every single route on a detailed Triptik page. They do like interstates, mostly!)


    Donna

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default The Cavalry is Just Over the Hill

    I'll be more than happy to help you, but this is really something that needs to be done interactively which works best in person. Do you have a particular mapping program that you use? Are you a member of AAA? What have you got so far? While we've given you plenty of advice, we don't know which bits of it you've decided to incorporate into your own trip. If you'd like to lay out what you've got, what your most important stops and roads are, what parts of the trip you're having problems with and why, and any limitations on the kind of roads you want to drive and/or the kinds of areas you enjoy or would rather avoid - all of that will help in letting people plan those turn-by-turn instructions that you need.

    And programming a GPS isn't really that hard. What make/model do you have? Surely someone here should be able to tell you how to put in enough way points that you can use it with confidence on your journey.

    AZBuck

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