Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Default Driving from LA to MInneapolis Help please!

    Hello! I will be moving and driving from LA to Minneapolis in a month. I want to leave around Nov 14, 2011. I know it'll take me about 3 days. However, I'm really worried about driving thru the snow. I have never lived in snow and wouldn't really know how to drive it let along across country. I really would rather drive my stuff in my car across country than to ship everything. Would you happen to know if it might be a bad drive around that time that I should just ship my car instead? I'm not sure where to get help but I came across your blog and wanted to know if you were driving thru winter months or would you even recommend driving over in a month.

    THank you!!
    Sarah
    Last edited by Midwest Michael; 10-20-2011 at 07:35 PM. Reason: Moved post to its own thread, removed quote from 5 year old post

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,064

    Default known and unknown

    Welcome to the RTA forum!

    The first thing you need to know is that this really will take you about 4 days, not 3. That's already going to require you to be on the road for 8-10 hours a day, which is really the most you should shoot for. Three days is really only possible in a speed run with multiple drivers, and that would be pretty brutal, and its certainly not something you want to do on a first major trip like this.

    As far as the weather goes, that really is a complete unknown. There is simply no way of telling you today what the weather will be on a specific day next month. Ultimately, the only thing that does matter is what it will be when you are actually on the road. I've made the drive you are talking about in February and didn't seen a single weather issue, but someone traveling just a few days later might have had a very different experience.

    Keep in mind that even in an extreme winter, it only snows a relatively small number of days, so its certainly not something where you can say you can't do it or would hit a storm. Your best bet is to watch the forecasts so you know what you are getting into, and be flexible - building in an extra day or two so that you don't feel rushed and you can sit and wait for a storm to pass if you do have the bad luck of seeing bad weather during your travels.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    South of England.
    Posts
    10,749

    Default Interstate.

    Just to add to Michaels comments. The Interstates are top priority when it comes to clearing roads and keeping the country on the move, with millions of Americans and tourists using them all year round. So keeping up to date with the weather forecasts and having that day or 2 to spare 'Just in case' will put you in good shape. As well as the road crews, the daytime volume of traffic helps to keep the snow/ice settling on the road. To take advantage of this, if it has been snowy and/or icey, do not to head out too early and be off the road not too late. Keep travel times in and around the normal working day.

    In the right frame of mind and being properly prepared with enough time to spare if needed, you haven't much to worry about. If you end up in a winter storm or any type of conditions you don't feel comfortable with, simply pull into a service area or a Motel and let it pass by why you get rested.

  4. #4

    Default Further emphasis

    Hello shorng,

    No intent to "pile on" here, rather just some additional emphasis of what's been said already.

    Regarding Winter travel in the West, you can safely assume the following:

    1) It's going to snow some, and particularly in higher elevations where Interstates and major highways go through passes.

    2) The snow is going to accumulate on the highway surface

    3) But not for long, not long at all. The Mountain West states have state-of-the-art equipment and highly professional operators whose sole task is keeping the Interstates open, including the aforementioned passes.

    4) As a whole, the West is open for business, and all forms of motorized travel, 24/7, all winter long. One may find a pass or some highly-exposed, high wind segment of Interstate closed for a few hours at a time during the middle of an extreme event, but that's about the worst of it. My experience says there are normally many and large electronic signs warning motorists of temporary closure, allowing us to get off the highway well before the closed segment, have a cup of coffee, a piece of pie, or a short nap, and proceed once the Pros From Dover have completed their tasks.

    Foy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,271

    Default

    The fastest route is I-15/I-70/I-76/I-80/I-35. I-70 goes over 11000 feet in the Rockies and the likelihood of encountering snow through there is fairly high. I-15/I-40/I-35 is 200 miles longer and it MIGHT be a better bet, but there's still some likelihood of adverse conditions, I-40 goes over 7000 feet in Arizona. You need to be flexible and keep abreast of conditions to make a proper decision.

    If you are moving to MN, you need to get used to snow pretty quick!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    4,546

    Default

    If you're driving a CAR, "glc" gives you a good route to use. The beauty of I-70 west of Denver makes that drive beautiful.

    However, if you're driving a U-Haul, I'd use the extra 200 miles (and another tank of fuel) and take I-15 to I-40 to I-35. Hubby just did that with a U-Haul and the worst part of the trip was wind. (He was coming in the opposite direction, however.) He didn't want to take a U-Haul over 11,000 ft elevation.


    Donna

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,064

    Default

    A uhaul itself has plenty of power to get over I-70 through Colorado, and even pulling a trailer they do pretty well. When I moved back to the midwest from California that is the very route I took with a Uhaul, pulling my car on a trailer. It was a little slow getting over the mountains, but really not bad at all. If I hadn't been towing, I have not doubt I would have easily been able to maintain 65 mph for the entire drive. And considering 200 miles would mean about another $70 in fuel and nearly a half day on the road, I'd want to have a very good reason to take that kind of detour.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,271

    Default

    If I were doing that trip in a rental moving truck, I'd insist on a diesel. They can handle mountains a lot better than a gasser.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-01-2011, 03:18 PM
  2. Things to See on a Driving Vacation From Minneapolis to Washington DC
    By Traverse in forum Planning Summer RoadTrips
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-13-2010, 08:34 PM
  3. HELP! Need advice on driving frm Seattle to Minneapolis in early December
    By Brenda2101 in forum Fall & Winter RoadTrips
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-19-2009, 08:00 PM
  4. Driving to Minneapolis from Needles, CA
    By GoodyearAZGal in forum Planning Summer RoadTrips
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-23-2007, 03:45 PM
  5. Driving from Minneapolis to Bangor Maine
    By goalgolf in forum Planning Summer RoadTrips
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-06-2006, 08:59 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • Find the Perfect Hotel
    Search RoadTrip Motels
    Enter city name

    Loading...



  • MORE STORIES