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  1. Default Help a foreigner

    Gentlemen,

    I will be travelling to the States for a couple of days because of business and I need some advice.

    I want to drive between Chicago and Green Bay (Wisconsin) around end of january. It's only 330 kilometres but it's winter time and I have never drove (sp?) with snow...

    If not, it's possible to rent a remisse ? I don't want to fly in for such a short distance and I want to see a little bit of the country..

    I will move south a couple of days later and also I will want to drive between Houston and Dallas here I think the winter is not a problem...I am correct ?

    Any advice or suggestion is welcome

    T

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,064

    Default

    Welcome to the RTA Forum!

    GB to Chicago is a pretty easy drive, that should only take about 4 hours, assuming you're sticking to I-43/I-94 and you don't hit rush hour in Milwaukee or traffic in Chicago. Yes, it does see snow, but it takes a pretty major event before it creates a serious impact on the ability to drive it, and in the worst cases, the roads are cleared and back to normal within 24 hours.

    I don't know what a remisse is so you'll have to explain what you're talking about there.

    Its rare for Houston to see snow (although it does happen every once in a great while) but Dallas does see snow or more likely ice more often. Although even there its a couple times a year event that's fairly unlikely to impact you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    South of England.
    Posts
    10,749

    Default Private cab ?

    I think you mean a car and driver rental, like a private taxi ? I would have thought would work out rather expensive as it will be an 8 hour round trip for the driver and would [I imagine] fall under the "Limousine hire" category in the US.

    This type of transport ?
    Last edited by Southwest Dave; 12-29-2010 at 07:56 AM. Reason: Added link

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,064

    Default

    If a hiring a driver is what you are talking about, then your trip will likely cost you hundreds of dollars, and it would be far cheaper to fly.

    Other ground based options would be a Greyhound Bus, or Amtrak which would be a bus to Milwaukee and then Train to Chicago.

  5. Default

    Thanks Gentlemen !!!

    So it seems it will be rather easy for me to rent a car and drive in to GB fom Chicago !!!
    Yes, indeed I thought that a taxi would be easier but it seems it is much more expensive .

    I enjoy driving so it will not be a problem that short distance. I will only use highways.

    I was just worried of driving with snow as I have never do it but it seems that it will be rather easy.

    Thanks again.

    Tordo

  6. Default Never drove in snow?

    I was just worried of driving with snow as I have never do it but it seems that it will be rather easy.
    NO.NO.NO!!! It is NOT!

    I live in the Detroit area, and have driven in all types of snow and ice conditions. In my opinion, if you've never driven in snow before, a several hour drive is NOT the time to learn! That 4 hour trip can turn into a 14 hour trip. I'm serious. Been there, done that.

    Imagine losing control of a 2000 lb projectile! That is exactly what a car is in the snow. And an inexperienced driver in the snow is a hazard to everyone else out there. Being inexperienced, you will surely drive much slower than those around you, which is a hazard in itself.

    If icy or freezing rain is forecast, DO NOT rent a car! DO NOT!

    If the roads are clear and dry, just be careful. While the expressways may be safe, the ramps may be icy, the overpasses can have ice while the road is dry, and the sidestreets can be a hazard. BLACK ICE is a killer.

    If you are caught in such conditions, imagine that your car is a boat. It may take one car length to stop for each 5 to 10 miles an hour you are traveling. And NEVER stomp on the brakes; you must PUMP the breaks to stop safely unless you have antilock breaks. In fact, forget that. Make sure the car you rent HAS antilock brakes, and learn how to use them.

    If you are caught in the snow, find a close empty parking lot and practice braking and turning.

    Watch the weather report carefully.

    And, make sure you buy enough insurance. A simple fender-bender can cost thousands!
    Last edited by Mark Sedenquist; 01-01-2011 at 12:11 AM. Reason: fixed typo for clarity

  7. Default

    Wowwwww.....well, it seems I returned to the beggining...

    So the best thing is to fly in for only 300 kilometres ?????? Or rent a Taxi ???? This will cost more than a plane...

    Thanks for the advice. I am a very responsable driver so I will not do anything that can put in risk other drivers.

    Happy New Year to everyone !!!!!!

    T

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,064

    Default

    While it certainly is true that driving in snow isn't simple and requires some practice, but saying you shouldn't plan to drive because it happens to be winter is a rather silly extreme.

    95% of the time, these roads are completely passable and in good condition. I drive 1,000 miles a week on many of these same roads you'll be using, and even in winter there are only a handful of times a year where the conditions so bad that they need to be completely avoided. If you do find yourself during the period of a storm, simply wait, and things will almost certainly be back to normal within a day or maybe two.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default Not driving advice is a bit extreme

    I would join the chorus and suggest you do drive. It will be memorable and while driving well in ice and snow takes lots of practice and skill -- I would still suggest you do it.

    Mark

  10. Default Safety is my first concern.

    My advice is for a long drive in icy conditions for someone who has NEVER driven in snow before.

    In my opinion, this is more dangerous than driving fatigued, and just a short drive in bad weather can lead to extreme fatigue. I drive an hour to work. On snowy days it can be two hours or even three. Even with only an inch of snow, it can be a scary and exhausting experience. As others have already stated ...

    it certainly is true that driving in snow isn't simple and requires some practice

    and

    driving well in ice and snow takes lots of practice and skill

    A novice driver can quickly get over their head in a fresh snowfall. Watch the weather reports, and if bad conditions are forecast DO NOT drive that distance. If you MUST drive, then here are some websites with good winter driving advice.

    Winter driving tips from RTA!

    Driving on Ice tips... Roadragers.com

    A few more tips from a law firm
    Last edited by Mark Sedenquist; 06-04-2015 at 02:55 PM.

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