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  1. Default Driving moving truck Chicago to Southern Oregon February 8

    I am going to be driving a 16' moving truck towing a Toyota Camry from central Illinois to southern Oregon. We are leaving February 8 and do not have any time constraints. I will be driving I-80 all the way to Sacramento, and will then pick up I-5 north to Oregon. I have driven a mini van towing a pop up camper but that is my only experience. Any help from this forum would be appreciated. I'm freaking out about driving this tonage in the mountains...I'm a Flatlander! Also, what are the best sites to visit regarding road conditions.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default Flat and Straight Through the Mountains

    Welcome aboard the RoadTrip America Forums!

    The simple fact is that all Interstate Highways, I-80 and I-5 included are built to design criteria which limit the grade and curvature of those roads. Indeed, if it weren't for the {gorgeous!) scenery and the occasional extra lane for extra long (but less than 6%) grades, you wouldn't know those roads were in the mountains. Most states maintain websites that list the current conditions of their roads such as this one for Wyoming which I found by just doing a search on 'Wyoming highway conditions'.

    AZBuck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,063

    Default a long detour

    Out of curiosity, why are you planning to go all the way over to Sacramento?

    If anything, that's going to mean you'll be driving over more mountains - as you'll have to cross the Sierras and then the handful of passes in Northern California and Oregon. Not to mention, that route adds 500 miles - a full day on the road - to the more direct route of taking I-84 from Utah to Oregon.

    As far as the actual mountain driving, as Buck said, if you are sticking to the Interstates, its really not going to be a problem for you. A moving truck will have plenty of power to easily move through any terrain you'll be dealing with.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    Michael, the OP said "southern" Oregon - I think we need to know a more specific destination. I-80 to I-5 may well be the best way if staying on the Interstates is a priority.

  5. Default

    I am heading to Medford. I am a female driving with my two college aged children. I just assumed sticking to the major interstates was wise during February. I was also concerned about gas availability as I am sure the truck will be sucking it up. I am open to anyone recommending alternate routes as long as I don't end stranded atop a snowy mountain :)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default If It Works For You

    While gas availability really shouldn't be a concern anywhere on your trip, I would make a point of topping up whenever the gas gauge got to ¼ or so. They tend to drop a bit faster after that point than before. And I-80/I-5 is a perfectly straightforward way to go. Computer mapping routines tend to suggest US-395/CA-44/CA-89 as a shortcut from Reno through Susanville to Dunnsmore, but I think you'd far more enjoy the peace of mind of using I-80/I-5 and pay the approximately 140 mile 'premium' rather than drive through the mountains on two lane roads with your rig. Also, be sure to make use of the many relaxing stops just off I-80 as you work your way west.

    AZBuck

  7. Default

    Thanks so much for all the information. My husband agrees that I should stick to I-80/I-5 route. I'd definately feel more comfortable driving in the right lane and letting everyone wiz on by. The two lane route would be great by car but not with a rig. Thanks again...goodbye bitter cold midwest hello beautiful 50 degree Medford.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    My mapping software sends you cross country from Winnemucca, and staying on 80 to 5 adds 225 miles. However, it only adds about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Well worth it for peace of mind driving that rig. Taking I-84 from SLC to Portland then back down adds 265 miles and about 1 hour and 45 minutes. That would be a very viable alternate if there are weather issues on I-5 south of Medford and I-84 is clear.

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