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  1. Default Magazines --2 tips

    Okay, this is a tiny tip on how to save money -- not just on trips, but anytime: We used to always buy a magazine for an airplane ride; it seems logical, after all. You have to be at the airport early, and then you can pick up a magazine while you're waiting for your plane to board . . . but magazines have gone sky-high lately -- at $5-6 each, that's a meal!

    Tip 1:
    Now we go to the library before a trip to get our magazines. The small branch library where we usually go almost always has a box of FREE magazines. People donate these because they don't want to keep them, but they don't want to throw them away. Yesterday I even lucked into a couple diabetic cooking magazines, which is very handy since my husband was just diagnosed with the disease. Yesterday my daughter and I went to the library (actually to return the books-on-tape, which we'd uploaded to our iPods for our trip), and we picked up about ten magazines for our family of four to enjoy. If you're not too picky about exactly what you read on the plane, it's a great idea.

    Tip 2: (I took this one from Budget Travel magazine)
    When your plane flight's done, leave your magazine behind. You're not going to read it again anyway, and the person on the next flight will enjoy it.
    The flip-side of that tip: Be the last person off the plane, and look to see who else has left a magazine behind. My husband travels frequently for business, and he often brings home something I wouldn't have considered buying, but often I enjoy them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Joplin MO
    Posts
    9,270

    Default

    On a related topic, here's something else. I go out to the San Diego area every winter to visit my sister and get out of the cold. I found a little bookstore in Santee that's run by the volunteer friends of the library. They sell donated used paperbacks for 50 cents. Maybe your city may have something similar.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    6,936

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrsPete View Post
    ..... Be the last person off the plane, and look to see who else has left a magazine behind. My husband travels frequently for business, and he often brings home something I wouldn't have considered buying, but often I enjoy them.
    Yup, that's me... need a wheelchair to get to and from the plane, so am always, first on, last off. Airports are great places to leave unwanted books and magazines. Bookcrossing books are often left at airports. Might pay to watch out for them.

    There are many places where you can pick up free, or very cheap, reading material. I would never consider buying reading matter at the airport. This trip I lucked out, picking up a great paper back - torn cover, published in 1969 - at the first hostel in which I stayed. By then I had finished the book I brought from home. Most hostels, and I notice many RV campgrounds have book and magazine exchanges.

    In the same way, I never throw out travel brochures with which I have finished, but leave them in some place enroute.

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