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  1. Default Making the long drives comfortable

    Hey guys,

    I drive a 99 honda civic hatchback. It is a great little car and I love it. I just installed a 10 CD mp3 changer and I am ready for long drives.

    However, I wanted to make my drive as comfortable as possible. I do not have a center arm rest, so folded a pillow and stuck it between the seats and it works fine :). Are there any products I can buy, such as a seat or neck & back support that can make me feel comfortable when on a long drive?

    I am getting ready to go on a lot of trips this year. so please suggest products you have heard of or used.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Green County, Wisconsin
    Posts
    13,067

    Default comfortable car

    Personally, I don't use any thing like that in my trips, because I find the seats in my primary roadtrip vehicle to be pretty comfortable even over the long haul.

    About the only thing I have ever used was a back support pillow that I used in a car where I could never get enough lower back support. I don't have that car anymore, so I don't use it anymore, however.

    But I do think your current plan, using pillows and other things you already have lying around the house can work just as good as any specifically-marketed product that you'll find out there.

  3. Default

    Thanks Michael.

    I was looking at the trucomfort II seat that can be placed for a car. It is around $125. I am not sure whether it is worth spending that amount of money on that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Western/Central Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,703

    Default Stretch

    Don't forget to get out and stretch every couple of hours or so. There is only so much that pillows, etc, are going to do for your back, neck and legs.

    Having good seats goes a long way towards reducing fatigue, however, and if you are planning on taking many long trips in this vehicle, buying something that will hold up over the long haul would be a good investment. The vehicles I drive on a regular basis have lumbar support, and that too is a good option to have. I have yet to find a seat that is long enough in the thigh area, though.

    If you're so inclined, you might even be able to find a decent driver's seat that would fit in your vehicle at an auto salvage yard. This isn't a good option if your vehicle has seat airbags, though.

  5. Default

    Absolutely, the best advice is to have frequent stops, even if it's just for a three minute stretch. Pillows and such can be helpful - I know someone who used those over the chair massage pads while driving - but your still stuck in the same seated position. The key is to get out of the vehicle and change the dynamic. Also helpful to prevent possible blood clots that can form after long periods of sitting.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,060

    Default We have several tips for you!

    Here is an article about conducting Speed Runs with several tips for dealing with the stress of long-time behind the wheel -- and that blood clot issue is discussed herein as well.

    Mark

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    6,937

    Default Topographical maps

    Mark, in one of the links from that thread, it mentions carrying topographical maps. Whereas I always carry these at home, have to date not found out where to buy them in the US .

    Do these cover a complete State, or are they most 1/100? 1/50? 1/20? or ?? And what should one expect to have to pay for them?

    Lifey who'd like them for the more remote areas

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    209

    Default USGS Maps

    Lifey,

    you can find all kinds of topographical maps at the USGS Store.

    Here are some more links for you:

    USGS Store Maps Page
    State Maps
    USGS Map Dealers
    USGS Map Locator This is pretty cool. You can download topo maps free of charge. Zoom in to the location you want, click on the "Topo" tab, then click on the red placemarker to see the topographic maps of that area.

    You can find shaded relief maps of individual states at this website. The University of Texas Libarary has maps of the United States and maps of U.S. National Parks and Monuments available online.
    Last edited by howard; 02-02-2009 at 01:53 AM. Reason: Forgot to mention that the download is free.

  9. #9

    Default Benchmark and DeLorme

    Quote Originally Posted by Lifemagician View Post
    Mark, in one of the links from that thread, it mentions carrying topographical maps. Whereas I always carry these at home, have to date not found out where to buy them in the US .

    Do these cover a complete State, or are they most 1/100? 1/50? 1/20? or ?? And what should one expect to have to pay for them?

    Lifey who'd like them for the more remote areas
    Lifey,

    For several years I've been a big fan of the DeLorme series of state-by-state topographic maps. But, the contour interval in low-relief states is too great for much of a feel for detailed topography and the contour lines tend to be a bit difficult to read elevations off of and are a bit faint by comparison to roads, railroads, bodies of water, etc.

    In the past couple of years I've become a big fan of the Benchmark map book series. Like DeLorme, they're published on a state-by-state basis. Unlike DeLorme, however, Benchmark shaded relief maps are very sharp and provide much better detail of topography. They're around the same price at $22-25 per state, but I believe the Benchmark books are limited to the Pacific Coast and Mountain West states, while DeLorme covers all of the continental US. Within each series, scales vary, but by way of example, my recently-purchased Utah Benchmark book has 48 large pages devoted to shaded relief topo coverage. I would say the scale is around 1/100,000--not detailed enough for survey work, but plenty fine for planning and general navigation, particularly when you've got a GPS for backup.

    Foy

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lifemagician View Post
    Mark, in one of the links from that thread, it mentions carrying topographical maps. Whereas I always carry these at home, have to date not found out where to buy them in the US .

    Do these cover a complete State, or are they most 1/100? 1/50? 1/20? or ?? And what should one expect to have to pay for them?

    Lifey who'd like them for the more remote areas
    100 years ago I used to work for a camping store, and we sold topo maps for popular camping/hiking spots in our state. We could order them for anyplace in the US, and they arrived in less than two weeks.

    I've seen topo maps for national parks sold at Bass Pro Shop.

    I have a computer program called National Geographic National Park Maps -- bought it off eBay -- which can print off topo maps (whole park, close-ups, whatever you want). There's a type of waterproof paper called Adventure Paper, which is very, very good for printing maps.

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