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  1. #1

    Default Road Trip From Boston

    Hey I'm new to the boards, but I've been reading the field reports for a couple weeks now. My buddy John and I are heading out for a 14 day road trip from late July into early August. This is my first road trip and I'm really excited. Looking for some expertise though. I have 14 days with 2 days for buffer room haha. I have a fair budget to work with. I'm saving now, so I'll have plenty of money for the trip.

    Let me tell you about myself first. My name's Chris. I'm from the Boston, MA area. Never really been anywhere further than Washington, DC by road. I have taken a plane to FL and went to DisneyWorld, but I know the trip would've been a lot better on the road. I'm 20 years old and graduated from college last year. I'm a thrillseeker, always wanted to go skydiving, learn to fly a plane, and a bunch of other things that I wont go into too much detail with. I love sports, too, having played in high school and college. I love the history of baseball.

    Trying not to get sidetracked here, I'm looking to plan out a trip as far as I can go in 14 days. Looking for scenic drives and just plain old fun. I've looked at other field reports and everywhere looks so inviting! Haha. So, I'm really undecided. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,059

    Default Lots of fellow baseball historians herein

    Quote Originally Posted by BostonChris View Post
    I love the history of baseball.
    Welcome to the Great American RoadTrip Forum! I assume that you know about Chris Epting's work with respect to historical baseball stadiums? Moderator Michael has some tips about planning baseball road trips that you might find useful.
    I have a fair budget to work with. I'm saving now, so I'll have plenty of money for the trip.
    What budget are you using? Here are some more tips on that score.
    Trying not to get sidetracked here, I'm looking to plan out a trip as far as I can go in 14 days
    I would suggest a point no further west than Utah or Colorado will offer you ample places to thrill-seek on your first major road trip.

    Mark

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default First Choice

    Welcome aboard the RoadTrip America Forums!

    Of all the variables that need to be thought about before a RoadTrip, the most basic is this: Is it about the trip or the destination? With two weeks from Boston, you could get anywhere in the contiguous 48 states and back in two weeks, but if you chose the far opposite corner of the country, southern California, you'd be pretty much committing yourselves to driving pretty much all day, every day, with little time to actually spend on experiencing all the places and things you'd be driving by. If, on the other hand, your trip is to be about the journey rather than the destination, then I think that you should limit yourself to the eastern half of the U.S. Doing meandering drive down the east coast, some time on the backbone of the Appalachians, poking around the south, up the Mississippi and back home by way of the Great Lakes would let you spend a bit more time 'on the ground' and yet still expose you to a good bit of the variety our country has to offer, and for around 2000 fewer miles than a coast-to-coast-and-back trip. But ultimately the basic framework of your trip is up to the two of you. Once you have a basic plan, people can be of \more specific assistance, but the flow you're going to go with is your call.

    AZBuck

  4. #4

    Default

    Welcome to the Great American RoadTrip Forum! I assume that you know about Chris Epting's work with respect to historical baseball stadiums? Moderator Michael has some tips about planning baseball road trips that you might find useful.
    Thanks for the info Mark. I love the history of baseball, but I think I'm leaning towards seeing more of America's big cities. Sticking to the eastern side of the nation. Just a quick preliminary route I was pondering was:

    Boston, MA
    Philadelphia, PA
    Cleveland, OH
    Chicago, IL
    Nashville, TN
    Dallas, TX
    Houston, TX
    Charlotte, NC
    Richmond, VA
    and then back to Boston, MA

    I have it as 70 hours, 4397 miles. Does that sound doable? I'd like to spend at least a few hours scoping out the sites. BTW, I used mapquest's itinerary program to come up with this list. I love the program. Very easy to use. Prints out all the directions nicely and it'll send a link to the map via email, so I sent it to my buddy John who's coming along on the adventure. Very cool.

    What do you think? Anything you would recommend I check out. Go here instead of there, etc.? Any beautiful roads I should travel? Places to eat?

    I would like to do some light hiking at some point in the trip to relax some. Any scenic places you've been to?

    What budget are you using? Here are some more tips on that score.
    I loved the budgeting resource you recommended. Very informative. After doing some math I came up with around $1800 between the both of us.

    Welcome aboard the RoadTrip America Forums!

    Of all the variables that need to be thought about before a RoadTrip, the most basic is this: Is it about the trip or the destination? With two weeks from Boston, you could get anywhere in the contiguous 48 states and back in two weeks, but if you chose the far opposite corner of the country, southern California, you'd be pretty much committing yourselves to driving pretty much all day, every day, with little time to actually spend on experiencing all the places and things you'd be driving by. If, on the other hand, your trip is to be about the journey rather than the destination, then I think that you should limit yourself to the eastern half of the U.S. Doing meandering drive down the east coast, some time on the backbone of the Appalachians, poking around the south, up the Mississippi and back home by way of the Great Lakes would let you spend a bit more time 'on the ground' and yet still expose you to a good bit of the variety our country has to offer, and for around 2000 fewer miles than a coast-to-coast-and-back trip. But ultimately the basic framework of your trip is up to the two of you. Once you have a basic plan, people can be of \more specific assistance, but the flow you're going to go with is your call.
    Thanks AZBuck. It's definitely about the trip for me. The destinations are very flexible. I'm just looking to have a great time and a lot of fun. I'd like to see the different cultures. I remember when I went down to FL, I found it so funny how big of a difference there was from the people who lived in FL and the people who lived in Boston, MA. Boston is very fast paced. Big city, people running around to get to their destination, etc. Then, FL is very relaxed, very peaceful. Then, there is the environment. Warm/cold, Palm trees/pine trees, etc. I like those kind of things, so I'd like to see that. I'm looking to have some fun too. Bungee jumping. Flying airplanes. Stuff like that.

    Thanks for the help guys. You've got my mind working double time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    9,358

    Default Flying

    As it happens, I am (or was until I lost my medical certificate) a pilot and the past president of a flying club in central New York. It occurs to me that one thing you could do on your trip around the country is take a whole bunch of "introductory" flights. Cessna offers such flights for a very nominal fee (compared to the actual cost) at its flying centers. The catch is - only one to a customer. But I'm pretty sure that only means one to a customer at each center. The bad thing is that if you just roll up to one without an appointment, you may find that all their instructors and/or planes are booked up. Still, if you stop at several, you should get a few flights in

    AZBuck

  6. #6

    Default

    As it happens, I am (or was until I lost my medical certificate) a pilot and the past president of a flying club in central New York. It occurs to me that one thing you could do on your trip around the country is take a whole bunch of "introductory" flights. Cessna offers such flights for a very nominal fee (compared to the actual cost) at its flying centers. The catch is - only one to a customer. But I'm pretty sure that only means one to a customer at each center. The bad thing is that if you just roll up to one without an appointment, you may find that all their instructors and/or planes are booked up. Still, if you stop at several, you should get a few flights in
    Wow, thats excellent info. Thanks. I'm really into flying. It looks like a lot of fun. Yeah I find that a lot of intro flights are around $99 so maybe I can get a couple flights in on the trip.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default You're off to a good start

    Boston, MA
    Philadelphia, PA
    Cleveland, OH
    Chicago, IL
    Nashville, TN
    Dallas, TX
    Houston, TX
    Charlotte, NC
    Richmond, VA
    and then back to Boston, MA

    I have it as 70 hours, 4397 miles. Does that sound doable?
    We typically recommend that people use 53mph as a guide for how many miles you can cover when east of the Mississippi (57mph west of it). That comes out to more like 82 hours. Note that this includes time for very quick stops for fuel/food/bio breaks, no lingering.

    I think as long as you're flexible, that this is do-able. You might take your trip with the idea that you might decide to cut off some of these stops. If you like a place and want to linger, let yourself do it. Adjust your route on the fly. If you don't make it to Dallas & Houston this trip, so what?

    I suggest this because, while you're trip is do-able in 2 weeks, I think you'll find that the pace is still a bit much and doesn't allow a lot of time to explore the various cities you're visiting or the sites along the way.

    I would want at least one full day, if not two, in each city. Travel time between each city is at least one day and, in some cases, two days. Heck, if you find some great places along the way to explore, you could stretch a one-day drive into two, three, or four. I think you should allow yourself permission to do that.

    So, when you add things up, I think your 2 weeks will be tight. Unless you just want a whistle-stop tour. And, hey, there's nothing wrong with that either.

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