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  1. Default Here is what happens...

    Here is what happens when you add together having damp wood, being to lazy at the time to properly start a fire and mistaking a bottle of camp fuel for charcoal fluid. Yes, I am king of the idiots...
    Last edited by Mark Sedenquist; 01-14-2008 at 05:34 PM. Reason: Preferred URL format herein

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default That wasn't really you, was it?

    Yeah, fire safety is pretty important. I can't tell you how many people I've seen when I've been out camping who truly don't have a clue about what they're doing. A little kindling and slowly building your fire works much better and is safer.

    To be honest, I usually leave this to my husband so my level of expertise in fire-building is pretty low. Hopefully, some folks who know what they're doing will pop in here and give some instructions on how to build a fire safely.

  3. Default Unfortunately it was...

    Quote Originally Posted by Judy View Post
    Yeah, fire safety is pretty important. I can't tell you how many people I've seen when I've been out camping who truly don't have a clue about what they're doing. A little kindling and slowly building your fire works much better and is safer.

    To be honest, I usually leave this to my husband so my level of expertise in fire-building is pretty low. Hopefully, some folks who know what they're doing will pop in here and give some instructions on how to build a fire safely.
    I am normally really good with fires and all who know me are aware of staunch position against using any kind of fluid. On this day however I was a little lazy and the wood was damp and I went for a quick fire and accidently grabbed a bottle of camp fuel instead of charoal fluid and there is a slight difference in their combustibility. This took place at a forest service cabin in Alaska and I would HIGHLY recommend them to anyone going to Alaska. They range from $25 - $50 a night and they are a great way to enjoy Alaska. No running water or electricity but great wood burning stoves and often close to water sources. It was a cool split between not staying in a hotel but having a little more shelter than a tent. I would really suggest doing this, especially if you are taking kids to Alaska - I would think they as well as the parents would really enjoy it.

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