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Thread: PA to IL

  1. Default PA to IL

    A couple buddies of mine and I are road tripping to just NW of Chicago early in january, we're actually planning to leave the 31st of December. We usually just take the turnpike the entire way, but this time we have a couple days due to unforseen circumstances.

    Anyway, what are some good roads to take and better yet, what are some good places to stop along the way? Like i said we have a couple days, so the route really isn't set but it can't be too crazy... I'll save trips like that for when my gf graduates...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Default Historic Highways

    Welcome aboard the RoadTrip America Forums!

    Sounds like you'd like something a fair bit different from the turnpike(s), but still relatively straight forward and not too slow. You're in luck. There are a number of historic early transcontinental roads and highways that you could use. Now that most of the traffic is on the Interstates, these roads can be quite enjoyable with surprises around many a corner. Take a look at the old Lincoln Highway and the National Road with its history. Once you're out on the plains of the midwest, there are a number of scenic roads through Ohio and Indiana on the way to Chicago

    AZBuck
    Last edited by Mass Tim; 12-26-2007 at 04:56 PM. Reason: fixed link

  3. Default

    Sweet, thanks!

    Also, I was wondering where to find lodging, I was planning to spend the nights in quiant little b&bs but I really have no idea how or where to find them... if not that, then maybe a "haunted" hotel or the like?

    (Yeah someday I plan to take a ghost tour of america, but that's much later...)

  4. #4
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    Default B&Bs are a Bit Different

    Unlike all those cookie cutter motel franchises along the interstates, B&Bs typically don't have roadside signs, they don't stay open to all hours, and are generally difficult to find (but not nearly impossible). What all this means is that using them requires some forethought and planning. You can't just say "Oh, I'll find one when I'm ready to stop for the evening." You will have to book in advance, but with that one caveat, finding them on the web is easy. Just use your favorite search engine and enter {Bed Breakfast townname}. Just as an example, I entered {Bed Breakfast Ohio} and the first site returned was the Ohio Bed and Breakfast Association with a "Complete List of Bed and Breakfasts in Ohio". Picking which one to use is a bit tougher. My wife chooses on the basis of decor (no pictures of the rooms means we don't even look at stopping there) and has come up with many, many good ones. You, of course, may have other criteria, but there will certainly be something to fill your needs.

    AZBuck

  5. Default

    Wow, great, now if only you could help me find some interesting stops to check out I might as well pay you for being my tour guide :p

    Course i don't want major tourist attractions, I'd prefer lesser known places like Lynn Runn and Flat Rock here where i live... prolly best to ask locals when we pass through, huh?

  6. #6
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    Default Other Pieces of the Puzzle

    OK - now I have a departure point, roughly Harrisburg. That always helps. The other things that will go into deciding where to stop are your interests and the actually time you have available. If I were making this trip, I'd stay south of the PA Turnpike by taking I-70 and US-40 west through Maryland with possible stops at Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, Fort Frederick State Park, Rocky Gap State Park or the future site of Noah's Ark. Then continue on US-40 across southwestern Pennsylvania seeing Fort Necessity (mentioned earlier) and on to Wheeling, WV. Once in Ohio, US-250 will take you into Ohio's Amish Country. In northwest Ohio, you have your choice of the Old Mill Stream Scenic Byway and/or the Lincoln Highway. Finally, US-30 would offer the most direct route up to Chicago to finish off your trip. This is, I believe, a 4-lane divided (but not controlled access) highway through woods and farming country for the most part. None of those roads or venues is going to be a major tourist attraction, but all will prove worthwhile.

    AZBuck

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