Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Default Solo Chicago to Deadhorse, Alaska--Food?

    So, I'm an avid driver, but have never before taken on anything of this magnitude or composition (both civilization AND serious lack of civilization--most of my trips are either one or the other).

    Anyways, assuming I don't deviate much from the planned itinerary, this trip will be approximately 9,000 (including some rather rough!) miles in total. I'm making the drive in a 1994 Camry as its potential last hurrah. As I'm hoping to make it up to the Arctic Ocean, down to Anchorage, and back to Illinois in under three weeks, it will be an aggressive, aggressive journey.

    I've got tons of questions that have already been answered in other posts, but I am still a bit shaky on the food aspect of such a trip. Since I'm not in an SUV with tons of space (and since I'll need to carry TWO extra full-size wheels and a host of other mechanical extras), I don't really have room for a huge cooler (which is how I have traditionally handled the food aspect of longer trips).

    Outside of civilian MRE's (which appear to be rather expensive overall), is there a resource I can tap in order to determine the best (low-cost, at least marginally healthy, and very little preparation--meaning no cooking involved) non-perishable sustenance for this trip? I'm planning on camping on the more remote stretches of the trip, but might do a few nights in hotels in the larger cities in Canada and Alaska.

    Any ideas on this, or, frankly, any other aspect of the trip would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    UVA

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 1998
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    10,059

    Default Have you fully considered the risks?

    Quote Originally Posted by UVAok View Post
    As I'm hoping to make it up to the Arctic Ocean, down to Anchorage, and back to Illinois in under three weeks, it will be an aggressive, aggressive journey.
    I like speed runs, but this journey is pushing the envelope a bit more than I think is reasonable. Welcome to the Great American RoadTrip Forum!
    I've got tons of questions that have already been answered in other posts, but I am still a bit shaky on the food aspect of such a trip
    I am pleased that we were able to be helpful for some of your questions. I don't think you can go that far and return in good condition in three weeks as a solo traveler. What I might suggest for the food is to get freeze-dried prepared food like that used by backpackers and supplement it with fresh fruit and vegetables as much as you can. Here are some more tips about high energy snacks that you can take as well.

    Mark

  3. #3
    RoadTripper Brad Guest

    Default This option will get old real quick

    And by old, I mean hard to swallow. You may want to consider improvising MRE's of your own: energy bars, dried fruit and nuts (trail mix), packaged juice or water that does not need to be kept cold. The only negative aspect I can think of right away is it's not a well balanced meal, and you'll probably never touch those items again after the trip.

    -Brad

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Editor View Post
    I like speed runs, but this journey is pushing the envelope a bit more than I think is reasonable.
    I certainly agree that it's aggressive, and I may not be able to get it all done in that amount of time; luckily, since I'm going it alone, I can change my itinerary on the fly to fit my fancy. However, I really would like to fit it all in in that time frame. I'll see how just how ambitious it is once I've actually been on the road a few days!

    On the food front, thank you both for the suggestions. I'll look into taking at least some civilian MRE's and dehydrated/freeze-dried meals, but, as has been mentioned, I imagine I won't be able to stomach them for too terribly long. I'm definitely a large fan of energy bars and dried fruits and nuts, so I suspect these will become somewhat of a staple as well.

    I think if I load up on that sort of thing and attempt to pick up some fresh fruits when in civilization, I should be able to survive (albeit not very healthily or deliciously).

    Thanks again,

    UVA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington state coast/Olympic Peninsula
    Posts
    3,318

    Default Oh, I think you can pack more than that!

    While I like those items, too, you could also get some fresh fruit, berries last awhile if you keep them in your cooler. Some veggies travel well, too. Carrots and celery, for example. Just bring containers for the berries and veggies so they don't get smashed. Sliced lunch meats, especially smoked ones, last awhile. So does pepperoni and smoked fish. I'm a big fan of canned albacore. Buy it in the foil bags if you don't want to deal with cans. Blocks of cheese last a long time if you wrap them up tight. Put them in a plastic container or ziploc bags. How about bagels and cream cheese? I bought mayo, ketchup and mustard in those little individual serving packets like you get at hamburger joints so I don't have to worry about refrigeration for them. It makes it handy to make sandwiches, etc. I wouldn't buy some of this stuff in large quantities because they will go bad if you don't eat them up. But I really think you'll be surprised at how much variety you can take in a cooler and in another container that doesn't require cooling allowing you to make a variety of healthy meals/snacks along the way.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-02-2008, 09:50 PM
  2. Food- Trip from Chicago to Cedar Point
    By Dave Markovits in forum Off the Beaten Path
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-07-2000, 12:49 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • Find the Perfect Hotel
    Search RoadTrip Motels
    Enter city name

    Loading...



  • MORE STORIES