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View Full Version : NJ-Chicago-Seattle (through N. Dakota)-Portland-San Fran.



SaintSimon
04-05-2010, 04:50 PM
July 1, my friends and I are leaving on that trip.

NJ to Chicago is the least of my concerns. It's a dream of mine to see North Dakota, so definitely going to drive through that on the way to Seattle.

Any tips for the road between those places, or for a good way back to the east coast from San Fransisco?

Glad I found this website, and thank you in advance!

Midwest Michael
04-05-2010, 05:04 PM
Welcome to the RTA Forum!

You're going to have to help us out a little more before we can be much help. This site is full of "tips" so you can find tons of information just by looking around, both at the forum and elsewhere throughout this website.

How much time do you have, what sorts of things are you interested in, how many of you are going, what are your ages, what about North Dakota is drawing you to that state? There is no one sized fits all roadtrip, and the more details we know about what you hope to achieve, the more we'll be able to provide some useful information.

SaintSimon
04-05-2010, 05:26 PM
Right, thank you for the welcome, and sorry for the lack of information.

All of us are 18, just about 19. Leaving July 1, and want to try to be back by the 27th. There will be at least two people, but maybe a third.

North Dakota has always been a dream of mine. It's definitely been romanticized and idealized in my mind, but it's something I've absolutely got to drive through.

I'm not too sure of my budget yet, that's something I'm in the process of figuring out.

Besides that, no real constraints. Just a desire to see this country of ours, and get loads of material for my writing :)

AZBuck
04-05-2010, 07:34 PM
Well, obviously I-94 is going to be the backbone of your travels through North Dakota, and like much of the Great Plains, the roads of that state largely run either east-west or north-south, sort of like a spine and ribs. The interesting bits are largely on the ribs, not the backbone, but with a couple of weeks to explore the state, that should not be a problem. By all means get off the main roads and into the small towns, especially moving westward where they (and the people) get sparse. Also, you'll need back stories for your writing so be sure to stop into at least a few of the native American centers and local historical societies to get a feel for what really went on in the settling of that part of the country.

AZBuck